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Bad Grammar

Discussion in 'Random Discussion' started by SKB, Aug 12, 2019.

?

Are you annoyed by people who lack the ability to converse clearly?

  1. Yes

    7 vote(s)
    58.3%
  2. No

    5 vote(s)
    41.7%
  1. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    It annoys me that younger people are losing the ability to verbally communicate in a clear fashion.

    I frequently hear younger people in shop queues turning their customer orders into questions, which aren't questions to begin with:


    "Can I get a latte without sugar please?"


    This always annoys me. The person has asked the question if they could get the coffee, instead of correctly ordering the coffee. By rights, the assistant could have just replied, "Yes, you can." and done nothing else. (I live for the day when I witness this happening....!)

    The correct order should have been:


    "I would like a latte without sugar please."


    Please don't use "Can I get" when ordering things. It's very weird turning orders into a question.
     
    #1 SKB, Aug 12, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
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  2. Messi

    Messi Force Sensitive

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    English is far away from being one of my best languages. So this kind of situation never will bother me.
    But I will try to use your tip when a situation like this takes place.

    PS. The same goes to "May I have..."?
     
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  3. daRinze

    daRinze Rebel Official

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    I would like an Episode 9 who'll totally blow my mind.



    Am I correct ? :eek:
     
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  4. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    Yes. Correct. And it is a very polite way too.
     
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  5. Jaxxon

    Jaxxon Force Attuned

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    As a fiction writer, I love regional dialects and conversational grammar quirks. I would never correct someone's spoken grammar. It says so much about who they are and where they're from. The same goes for informal online discussions (like this one!)

    But ALSO as a fiction writer, I really care about written grammar in formal contexts. I have no patience for poor grammar in published mediums.
     
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  6. daRinze

    daRinze Rebel Official

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    In fact, I think a poor grammar reflects a poor interest for others.
    Language is the way one communicates with others ; using an elegant language means caring the other one is speaking with.
     
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  7. Martoto

    Martoto Rebel General

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    It depends on the context.

    One thing I can't abide though is the justification by "common usage".

    [​IMG]
     
    #7 Martoto, Aug 13, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019
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  8. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    "common usage" just means most of the people are either misinformed, wrong or ignorant.

    Or all of the above.
     
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  9. Maximus

    Maximus Reel 2 Dialogue 2

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    be thankful if that's what you hear regularly.

    I dwell in the area just east of London (i'm an Essex droid) where you are more likely to hear something like...

    awite Bruv? Latte init, eight sugars mate

    :D
     
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  10. Addi Ras

    Addi Ras Jedi General
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    & how does that work out for you :D
     
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  11. Maximus

    Maximus Reel 2 Dialogue 2

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    hahaha!
    don't be jel mate.. be reem :p

    (p.s. i do NOT talk like that ! lol)
     
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  12. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    Time for another common everyday grammatical annoyance....


    Person1: "How are you today?"
    Person2: "I'm doing good."


    What does Person2 actually mean? That they're feeling well, fine or alright?
    Or that they've been doing good deeds, like rescuing cats out of trees, helping old ladies cross the street, giving food and shelter to the homeless, or perhaps treating ill people with newly discovered medicines that they've invented??!

    Unless you have actually been doing good deeds, the correct response by Person 2 should be:


    Person1: "How are you today?"
    Person2: "I'm well thankyou, How are you?"
     
    #12 SKB, Aug 14, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2019
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  13. daRinze

    daRinze Rebel Official

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    Oh, I'm thinking this topic would be a good place for a question I once asked somewhere here in the Cantina (I'm not an english natural, I'm french) : I was told at school that a possession should use the form possessor's possession ("whose racket is it ? it's Brian's racket!") so I asked should the title "The Rise of Skywalker" be renamed "The Skywalker's Rise" or is there a subtle difference between the two forms.

    I was given a full and compelling answer to my question, letting me learn some subtle difference between the two forms.
     
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  14. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    It would also depend on what variant of Skywalker is being talked about. A single member of the Skywalker family, or the entire family line of Skywalker.

    But as the film is not released until December, there can be no immediate answer to this mystery.
     
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  15. Maximus

    Maximus Reel 2 Dialogue 2

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    I need to point out that there is a fundamental mistake with "How are you today?".

    it should be:-
    [​IMG]
    :D
     
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  16. Martoto

    Martoto Rebel General

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    "How are you?" is a query regarding someone's state of being. So any response with "doing" is arguably inappropriate. :cool:

    "How are you?" is a really big question, if you think about it. But that kind of makes it useful as a converstation starter as the person responding can be as succinct or as expansive as they like.
     
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  17. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    "How are you?" is just a greeting. It is not a literal question.
    You should not reply so literally.


    PersonA: "How are you?"
    PersonB: "Well actually, (cough) I have car problems, my job sucks (sniff) and I have a contagious disease that you now have."


    PersonA would feel very awkward (and afraid) by such a literal response.
     
    #17 SKB, Aug 14, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2019
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  18. DarthSnow

    DarthSnow Master of Coin
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    Exactly. This is, quite oddly, the only instance where a question mark means nothing. So, saying "How are you?" is the same as saying "Hello?" ..... man I've just realized I've been leaving so many questions out of my daily greetings!
     
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  19. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    "Hello" is a word that was invented in the 19th century as a Victorian greeting when receiving a telephone call. The word "Hello" did not actually exist before the invention of the telephone.

    "Hello" is a slur of English-Germanic greeting words "Hallo!" or "Hullo!", which were originally used as a loud exclamation (or reactionary) word to gain attention from someone far away, such as when calling out to a distant friend, or when attempting to hire a horse-drawn taxi carriage ride.

    "Hello!", "Hallo!" and "Hullo!" are very similar to the north European word "Hei!" (or "Hey!" in American English, as many European-Americans have north European ancestors who continued using "Hei!".).

    "Hey!" (from "Hei!") is not a traditional English greeting, as its still used in England as a loud exclamation word to gain attention from someone distant. "Hey!" is the same as "Oi!". They are both used as attention or reaction words from when someone is very surpised and angered. Example: "Hey! (or Oi!) That's my car you're stealing, thief!"

    Greeting someone in England with a "Hey!" can be seen as being overly aggressive and rude, as it has the same meaning as "Oi!".

    "How do you do" is a formal greeting, which became contracted to "Howdy" ("How do you do") in the United States.
     
    #19 SKB, Aug 14, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2019
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  20. SKB

    SKB Force Sensitive

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    Another...

    People who pronounce mischievous as "mis-cheev-eee-ous", which is wrong as there is no i after the v.
    The correct pronunciation is "mis-chiff-ous".
     
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