1. Notification emails are working properly again. Please check your email spam folder and if you see any emails from the Cantina there, make sure to mark them as "Not Spam". This will help a lot to whitelist the emails and to stop them going to spam.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. IMPORTANT! To be able to create new threads and rate posts, you need to have at least 30 posts in The Cantina.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Before posting a new thread, check the list with similar threads that will appear when you start typing the thread's title.
    Dismiss Notice

Daisy Ridley: Fans Will Know the Complete Story Behind Reys Parents by the End of The Rise of Skywalker

Discussion in 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' started by SWNN Probe, Jul 1, 2019.

  1. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    Meanwhile, Daisy just stated that there would be more about her parents in TROS. If it wasn't setup to be a mystery, why would JJ feel the need to address it?

    Understand this fact. Rey's parents were supposed to be a mystery! Or at the very least, kept ambiguous to keep the audience engaged. If they were never meant to be important to Rey or the story, REY COULD HAVE SAID HER PARENTS PASSED AWAY WHEN SHE WAS YOUNG. If her parents didn't matter there are many ways you could have written her character and the story of her parents so the audience would never question who they are. But JJ CHOSE to make this a point of mystery. JJ chose to use lines of dialog that HINT at possible parentage.
     
  2. DigificWriter

    DigificWriter Rebelscum

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Posts:
    213
    Likes Received:
    332
    Trophy Points:
    1,227
    Credits:
    350
    Ratings:
    +493 / 26 / -6
    There's a difference between having story that isn't yet told and story that is being deliberately hidden.

    You've convinced yourself that JJ set up a certain storyline with regards to Rey's parentage that Rian ignored, which just isn't the case, and that JJ will take the opportunity to undo what Rian established and tell the "real" story about her parentage, which also isn't the case.

    You've also convinced yourself that a lack of a preset overall outline for the Sequel Trilogy means that each film's storyline doesn't and can't fit together into a cohesive whole, which isn't the case at all and is likely to be proven with TRoS.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Wise Wise x 1
  3. SuperBenKenobi1992

    SuperBenKenobi1992 Rebelscum

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Posts:
    247
    Likes Received:
    269
    Trophy Points:
    1,572
    Credits:
    757
    Ratings:
    +425 / 5 / -3
    I think you'd find that the Last Jedi split the fan base right down the middle. I think there was a plan, but i think that plan went as far as we're are making three new star wars films to conclude the skywalker story and we are going to create it round robin style. this isn't a problem if there is an already planned basic plot. Meaning that Lucas film had to sit down decide where they wanted there story to culminate in to. For example they want to have the son of Han solo as the villain fighting against the daughter of Luke skywalker as like the final battle. now they give this to there writers and say make a trilogy with this end game in mind. So J.J writes his film and its introduces the universe and he does his mystery box approach, nothing is set in stone. Rian Johnson then comes and throws us off the trail and then Trevorrow was supposed to come in and wrap it up. That's all well and good for a collaborative process, however the problem is that in order to have a good story line you need to have a constant writer. For example Lawrence Kasdan could have been the primary writer for all three scripts and sat with the directors to teak things and write the scripts with them, that way you would have synced through line in the narrative.

    In regards to the Rey's Parentage thing I wish that people would stop saying that we made that mystery up. it is clear and evident that, weather she was supposed to be skywalker or not, it was made to look by the film makers in TFA that she might be one. Even if the only reason was for J.J's mystery box approach to make seem like anything is possible. I believe that a lot of u who are against the Last Jedi came a little too harshly on the franchise as a whole though i believe last jedi is a piece of art that is subject to criticism and those consuming the art she feel any way about it they want. the fact of the matter is the TLJ and TFA are two parts of a three part story and we need the final piece before we can really give our final judgement. I think Rey could have worked just fine as a nobody. I think here parents didn't have to be important but then they shouldn't have even teased all the possibilities and opened the mystery box to those possibilities. They should have led with that. to me that's like when you have a steak that looks like a steak and smells like a steak but when you bite into it its just ground beef.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Wise Wise x 1
  4. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    Funny, everything you just said, is wrong.

    I think you’re lumping me in with others. I’m not in the camp that there was no story outline. I believe they had a framework but that it could change based on each directors vision for their film. Just like Lucas changed his story a million times while making the films. JJ setup Rian with so many possibilities. Some very interesting like the Knights of Ren, which Rian chose to ignore completely. Rey parents are another. I never felt she was setup to be a Kenobi or Palpatine from anything in TFA. To me she was either long lost Skywalker blood or not related at all. The hints were there for both paths and Rian could have easily gone either way.

    I could go on all day with how Rians choices for Luke, Finn, Poe, Leia, etc we’re just not effective at moving their characters forward or telling an interesting story. The film isn’t holding up for me on repeated viewings. It’s now ranked in my bottom 3 with AOTC and TPM. It’s not a fun film and it didn’t continue TFAs story effectively for me. You may think it’s cohesive, I do not. I feel if JJ made TLJ, he would have made a vastly different film, even with the framework I’m sure they had going into this trilogy.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Kylocity

    Kylocity Rebel Official

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2017
    Posts:
    997
    Likes Received:
    2,278
    Trophy Points:
    7,717
    Credits:
    3,168
    Ratings:
    +3,096 / 27 / -16
    It is evident that Rey’s parentage and background is important because it is intimately connected with her fundamental attributes: Rey is an uber capable girl who is waiting to be rescued by her parents. JJ was right in highlighting this factor by making them a mystery. It is true that in the SW world parentage is a very loaded concept, but in the case of Rey, these absent parents are a hurdle to overcome in the growing up process, and the same is the case with Kylo. He also has to overcome the fact that his parent are very visible.

    This thematic thread is obvious in both TFA and TLJ. There is no doubt that JJ and RJ were both on the same page with regards to the theme of the ST: two young people growing up and dealing with what has come before, their previous generation, their roots, their identity. Both JJ and RJ are professional writers and know how to keep the plot relevant to the main theme, so it didn’t really matter to JJ what RJ bought about plotwise. The important thing is that RJ kept the character theme intact with his plot. It is possible that during the writing process different possibilities about Rey’s background were discussed and both writers explored different ways to better illustrate the generational struggle of a young person in the SW saga universe.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Wise Wise x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  6. greenbalrog

    greenbalrog Rebel Commander

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Posts:
    198
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    2,932
    Credits:
    826
    Ratings:
    +571 / 1 / -1
    I tend to agree with this. Surprises are great, but you can be surprised without requiring a mystery. So, the need for a mystery wasn't really required for a great movie experience, in my view. When we knew Vader was Luke's father, there was really no big mystery at that point. Obi-Wan said that "Vader betrayed and murdered [Luke's] father". So, there was no reason to believe he was lying, or let's say, stating things "from a certain point of view" :) And, JJ and the marketing team were going for the mystery, even Rey says it in TFA: "Yeah, big mystery".

    In other words, I think I would have preferred the story to be more linear, as it was the tradition of Star Wars before TFA, and probably use surprise more from twists and reveals instead of building up on a mystery, that frankly doesn't seem to have been that satisfactory for some, including me to a good extent.

    From what I see, Rey's family and origin is still an open issue, or at least not a fully finished one. It's strange this is the case when Rey said that it seemed obvious to her who Rey's parents/family were in an interview she gave after TFA (don't remember the source), and that she was a bit confused with the fans making a big deal out of it.

    I respect and enjoy JJ's movies and his vision for doing imaginative and thought provoking experiences. I love Star Trek 2009. However, I'm not really a fan of mystery boxes, like he did in Lost and now in TFA. Just my opinion on the matter, of course.

    \Edit: Upon reflection, Anakin's origin was kind of a mystery as well, so it's not really fair to say there were no mysteries in Star Wars till TFA. These Vergences of the Force, big mysteries they are ;)
     
    #86 greenbalrog, Jul 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
    • Like Like x 2
  7. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    Exactly this.
    --- Double Post Merged, Jul 5, 2019, Original Post Date: Jul 5, 2019 ---
    Similar to ROTJ when Luke gets confirmation Vader is his dad and that Leia is his sister, I think we get the final pieces to the parents puzzle in TROS.

    The issue I have with TLJ is how Rey wanted to know WHO her parents are. I always thought she knew WHO her family was but wanted to know WHERE they were and WHY they never came back. Hearing her say "they were nobodies" sounded more like the point of view of the audience, not her. I would assume she would have thought her parents were just normal people. Even Kylo's lines of "you have no place in this story, you're nothing..." lines feel like an audience view statement. Again for me, bad bad story telling.
     
    #87 techsteveo, Jul 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
    • Like Like x 2
    • Great Post Great Post x 1
  8. DigificWriter

    DigificWriter Rebelscum

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Posts:
    213
    Likes Received:
    332
    Trophy Points:
    1,227
    Credits:
    350
    Ratings:
    +493 / 26 / -6
    This is the last thing I'm going to say on this subject, so this post is going to cover a lot of ground:
    The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi tell a cohesive story with each other and with the forthcoming The Rise of Skywalker because every person involved in their development was/is aware of and beholden to what has/had come before. Rian Johnson and JJ Abrams have been allowed to tell the stories that they want to tell, but within the context of what has come before, and if you do not think that this is the case, you have a fundamental lack of understanding about how film production works.

    With the exception of the lightsaber-induced Force Vision, there is absolutely nothing in The Force Awakens that says "Rey is a Skywalker", and in fact the film repeatedly finds ways to dilute the validity of that interpretation through Rey's own actions and her interactions with Skywalker-connected characters. The reason that the film gave rise to so many "Rey Skywalker" theories is that people drew the wrong conclusions from the Force Vision and what it meant and chose to subsequently ignore both the remainder of the film's "signposts" that she could not be a Skywalker and the filmmakers' repeated attempts over the following two years to clarify what certain elements of the film's contents actually meant and disabuse viewers of interpretations of said contents that were inaccurate.

    The Last Jedi angered a very small subset of the Star Wars fandom not because of what it did or didn't do, but because of the sustained furor of speculation about and surrounding elements of The Force Awakens that were ultimately not important and that were never actually meant to be as mysterious as they were perceived to be and a misunderstanding of what certain characters' roles in the story were going to be and what had happened in-universe to set up the story of the Sequel Trilogy and The Force Awakens as it unfolded (this is an area where Abrams and Kasdan's viewpoints on the franchise had a negative effect on the narrative because they didn't understand why previous films had omitted expository dialogue or visual exposition or when and why exposition was important and therefore did not include things that they should have )

    I am someone who was not originally as impressed by The Force Awakens as many others were, but my issues with the film were not related to its contents but to Abrams and Lawrence Kasdan's personal viewpoints on Star Wars as a piece of filmic storytelling and have since been mitigated by frank and in-depth analysis and insight from other members of the fandom who have a far deeper understanding of and appreciation for the franchise - and for the filmic genre in general - than I do, and while it does occupy the bottom slot on my list of Favorite Films, I have come to appreciate it more and would - and will - gladly rewatch it.

    The Sequel Trilogy is different from what preceded it in that it is not specifically based on an overarching "meta-outline" to the same degree as the previous two Trilogies were, but that does not mean that it is devoid of cohesiveness in either production or narrative, which is something that I firmly believe will be made crystal-clear with the release of The Rise of Skywalker.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  9. greenbalrog

    greenbalrog Rebel Commander

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Posts:
    198
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    2,932
    Credits:
    826
    Ratings:
    +571 / 1 / -1
    Yes, but what I was trying to say is that neither Luke's reveal nor Leia's were the solving of a mystery. In fact, until the shock reveal in TESB that Vader was Luke's father, the idea didn't even cross my mind at all. I was a child back then, but still. Regarding Leia, I don't recall seeing Leia's origins as a mystery, nor Luke's for that matter. Leia had a royalty origin (from what we knew at the time), and Luke was a farmer in a desert world.

    So, the reveals were some final pieces of the puzzle in RotJ, but there were no mysteries to be solved, they were just twists. And therefore, my thesis is that you don't need a mystery in order to surprise people or to provide a superior story. Rey's origin on the other hand, was a mystery from the get go. They purposefully made a mystery out of it. A well crafted JJ mystery box, the one you can devise 1000 theories from and some of them could be equally valid.

    This mystery kept the fans guessing and speculating, and frankly expecting certain things, so it's no surprise many were unhappy with the result.

    So, personally, I don't like the mystery box tool much. I think it just gets in the way and plays with your mind. It can help create more excitement at the start, but in the end I think it has the potential to let many people down, because either you fulfill one theory and please some people and not others, or (even worse) you leave the mystery unresolved, only solving it at the last minute or never at all.

    That said, it's still too soon to judge, so I'll give the benefit of the doubt to JJ and co and will reserve my judgement after TROS is out and we have enough time to digest it. However, I'm already in a position to state my preference for having no mystery boxes. I din't like it in Lost and I don't like it here.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  10. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    You are exactly right. The mystery created didn't serve any purpose for me. Just tell us who they are and tell us their story. If there is a reveal later on, let it sneak up on us. If anything, the mystery and breadcrumbs are a lose, lose situation because someone will always be disappointed.

    Then you follow all of that up with Rian's style of "gotcha" storytelling like these examples...

    Oh look, Leia is dead, GOTCHA shes alive.
    Nooo, Finn is about to sacrifice himself on Crait, GOTCHA, Rose saves him.
    Rey and Luke are about to have a dramatic moment as she gives him the lightsaber, GOTCHA, Luke just throws it away and the scene is over.
    Whoa, Luke showed up at the end to help them fight, GOTCHA, he's not actually there.
    With Leia incapacitated some incompetent Admiral Holdo came to screw things up, GOTCHA, she actually has a plan but just didn't want to talk about it.
    Yay Finn and Rose found the master Codebreaker, GOTCHA, they are really getting arrested for a parking violation.
    Oh man, Ben Solo tried to kill Luke in the flashback, GOTCHA, it was actually Luke that thought about killing Ben first.

    So we had hints that lead nowhere and gotchas that serve no purpose. Both directors are guilty of gimmicky storytelling in my opinion.
    --- Double Post Merged, Jul 5, 2019, Original Post Date: Jul 5, 2019 ---
    If you have to explain your film after the fact, YOU'RE A BAD STORY TELLER. But I thought you were the one that understood film making?
    --- Double Post Merged, Jul 5, 2019 ---
    You have no evidence for the size of fandom that has been angered.
    --- Double Post Merged, Jul 5, 2019 ---
    This is a much different statement than "they had it all planned out". Of course they write the films based on what was written before it. But they had the freedom to go whatever direction they wanted. So you're not saying anything that anyone else is arguing about.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Great Post Great Post x 1
  11. Obi5Kenobi

    Obi5Kenobi Rebel Trooper

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2019
    Posts:
    70
    Likes Received:
    143
    Trophy Points:
    192
    Credits:
    276
    Ratings:
    +192 / 1 / -0
    This. I get the feeling that gimmics and misdirection took precedence over good story telling.

    I'm on the fence about TFA and TLJ but am hopeful that TROS will wrap things up nicely. But that hope is equaled by fear that it will disappoint. JJ LOST and JJ Trek are my basis for that statement. I really wish someone else was making TROS.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Rebel General

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2018
    Posts:
    715
    Likes Received:
    1,273
    Trophy Points:
    4,842
    Credits:
    1,474
    Ratings:
    +1,825 / 116 / -45
    Ultimately, E9 is going to line up much more with E7 than with E8. When all is said and done, E8 will be viewed as the odd-man out of the sequel trilogy. Sure, a very small minority of people ignore Rian Johnson's own words as he has stated time and again there was no plan. (Please note this is not, like, a single offhand comment that could be interpreted many different ways. He stated it over and over and over..... "there was no mapped story beyond TFA".... "There was no outline on the wall..." When he was asked "some of the story was planned, yes?" he responded "Nope.")

    So since we know beyond a shadow of a doubt there was no plan, that gives Abrams the freedom to do to RJ what RJ did to Abrams. Abrams can ignore E8 the way RJ ignored E7 (by all accounts, this is exactly what is happening). I think it is the smart move on many levels and as much as I would have loved to see Trevorrow's E9, I think the saga is better off having JJ doing it instead to establish some badly-needed cohesion in ST.

    Anyone who liked E7 should be excited for E9, whether they liked E8 or not.
     
    • Great Post Great Post x 1
  13. DigificWriter

    DigificWriter Rebelscum

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Posts:
    213
    Likes Received:
    332
    Trophy Points:
    1,227
    Credits:
    350
    Ratings:
    +493 / 26 / -6
    I was done with this discussion, but this line of thinking requires a response that is so crucial that I'm going to triple-emphasize it: Rian Johnson did not ignore anything that JJ Abrams did in The Force Awakens.

    Period. End of Story.

    If you believe otherwise, you are out of sync with reality.
     
    #93 DigificWriter, Jul 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
    • Rude Rude x 3
    • Like Like x 2
  14. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    He didn't have to ignore anything to write a film that didn't feel like the logical next chapter.

    He didn't ignore Luke and Rey's meeting on Jakku - he just wrote a stupid scene that didn't respect the intrigue JJ created by making it the final scene of TFA. That moment was a literal cliff hanger, and Rian disrespected our time by "flipping" us off with Luke's saber flip. We waited years for that scene and got THAT? Technically he didn't IGNORE what came before, but he treated that setup like crap.

    There are dozens of other examples but I'm not wasting my time.
     
    • Great Post Great Post x 2
  15. DigificWriter

    DigificWriter Rebelscum

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Posts:
    213
    Likes Received:
    332
    Trophy Points:
    1,227
    Credits:
    350
    Ratings:
    +493 / 26 / -6
    Everything you just said is purely your own opinion.

    Nothing that Rian Johnson did in The Last Jedi was in any way actually disrespectful to or ignorant of what Abrams did in or with The Force Awakens; It was subversive of people's expectations, but it quite frankly needed to be in order for the actual narrative of the Sequel Trilogy to move forward and is an extension of what various individuals associated with the series' production spent nearly two years trying to do.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Great Post Great Post x 1
  16. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    Your opinion. See how that works? Nothing you state is fact. It's your opinion. Let's move on.
     
  17. DigificWriter

    DigificWriter Rebelscum

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Posts:
    213
    Likes Received:
    332
    Trophy Points:
    1,227
    Credits:
    350
    Ratings:
    +493 / 26 / -6
    It's not my opinion, though; it's a factual reality based on numerous factors including, but not limited to, the following:
    * JJ Abrams being aware of - and, as a Producer, fully supportive of - everything Rian Johnson wanted to do in TLJ

    * The numerous instances in which various individuals directly associated with the franchise's production went out of their way to try and get fans to temper their own expectations concerning things like Luke's role in the story, Rey's parentage, and Snoke's backstory

    * The copious documentation of TFA and TLJ's production as presented in behind-the-scenes publications "The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens" and "The Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi"

    * Information from the personal Twitter accounts of various Lucasfilm employees/ former employees with intimate knowledge of the films' production indicating that some of the more "controversial" narrative decisions made in The Last Jedi were in fact " in play" - at least in a broad conceptual sense - long before Johnson began work on the film's screenplay
     
    • Like Like x 4
  18. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Rebel General

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2018
    Posts:
    715
    Likes Received:
    1,273
    Trophy Points:
    4,842
    Credits:
    1,474
    Ratings:
    +1,825 / 116 / -45
    +1 +1 +1

    I am not going to debate the semantics of the word "ignore" but what you wrote above is spot on. Rian Johnson's own statements confirm this. The only thing that enters the realm of speculation is the logical belief that JJ will not be beholden to E8 in the same way RJ was not beholden to E7. Further speculation - albeit another logical deduction - is that Abrams will be consistent with his own work presented in E7.

    I am not going to go into E9 spoilers/rumors here, but the trailer is considered fair game for discussion and suffice to say, we see a lot of this in the trailer. Ren's helmet was destroyed and completely unused in E8, but is back in E9. Anakin's Lightsaber was destroyed in E8 but is apparently back in E9. The mysterious Knights of Ren, who were completely ignored in E8, are back for E9.

    So how does this relate to the subject matter at hand? Well, to continue speculation, I surmise that if RJ had some sort of "original idea" for Rey's parentage, he'll probably go back to that idea and not feel obligated to what E8 told us. It would be a ridiculously easy retcon too. Just throw in a line about how "oh, uh, Kylo Ren was lying to you... you, uh, you misinterpreted your vision...." While giving us nothing definite, Ridley certainly implies there's more coming and that the E8 resolution to that matter is not going to be the final resolution.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  19. techsteveo

    techsteveo Force Sensitive

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Posts:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    3,653
    Trophy Points:
    12,167
    Credits:
    5,307
    Ratings:
    +6,510 / 294 / -173
    Excerpt from Collider article...

    Ridley has now wrapped on The Rise of Skywalker and presumably knows how the film ends—which is also being positioned as the conclusion to the entire Skywalker saga that began with George Lucas’ original film. But initially, Abrams was not the one crafting this conclusion. Lucasfilm first hired Jurassic World helmer Colin Trevorrow to co-write and direct Star Wars 9, but he left the project over creative differences. When asked by Horowitz if she ever spoke to Trevorrow about his plans, Ridley confirmed Trevorrow’s version of Episode IX was “very different”:

    http://collider.com/star-wars-9-daisy-ridley-rey-kylo-ren-fight/#images
     
  20. Perdu

    Perdu Rebel General

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2015
    Posts:
    447
    Likes Received:
    721
    Trophy Points:
    4,467
    Credits:
    1,295
    Ratings:
    +1,190 / 22 / -23
    Yes, TLJ was a complete instrument of subverting expectations and deliberately so. It was also tone deaf to many of the characters previous development and the events that created the scenarios for the subversion of the audiences expectations were heavily contrived.

    In regards to Rey's parentage, this is very much an example of deliberately subverting expectations - though, granted, not as contrived as many of the other developments. However, if you do not subscribe to your POV (and far more than a small subset do, I hate to break it to you), then it just doesn't work.

    That's the problem with making a movie so heavily dependent upon subverting expectations. . . . the audience has to be on the same page, otherwise it comes off as random and directionless.

    Re the small subset: I only know of one person that enjoyed TLJ. The other 10+ of my SW nerd friends cannot stand it. Just food for thought. We all left the theatre with our hands up in the air - and not one of us has purchased the movie - which is a first for all of us . . . even the one that enjoyed the movie.

    So your POV is well taken and has merit, but many of us disagree and that does not make you, me, or anyone else "out of sync with reality" or a "fundamental lack of understanding"

    "Period. End of Story."
     
    • Great Post Great Post x 2
Loading...

Share This Page