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This Movie Isn't Needed...I beg to differ.

Discussion in 'Solo' started by Jayson, Jun 2, 2018.

  1. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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    One of the comments I've read and heard periodically from both people who liked the film and didn't like Solo is that the film wasn't really needed.

    The point being made is something along the lines that Han Solo wasn't a character who was missing anything and needed anything filled in; that he was a full and complete character for the purposes for which he served.
    Sure, he refers to things we don't really know anything about, but nothing about him is demanding of a backstory because nothing in the story hinges on his backstory being filled in to make sense or work.

    For example, Vader, one could argue, was in need of a backstory because he does a 180 within just two scenes of a trilogy; keeping in mind Vader's only on the screen for about a bit less than a three quarters of an hour for the entire trilogy.
    Vader has roughly a little less than half of his entire trilogy time in this film at just around 15 minutes, and most of that screen time is on Endor and the Throne room; roughly around 9 to 10 minutes-ish (it's abouut 4-ish minutes for Endor and about 5-ish minutes in the Throne room).
    Considering that out of about 40 minutes of total screen time, we've spent roughly 20-plus some-odd minutes of it knowing Vader as just a mouth-breathing evil space battle mage with a silky voice of gold, we're somewhat thrust very rapidly in those two scenes to sympathize with Vader all of sudden.
    In fact, it's pretty arguable that we're thrust into sympathizing with Vader in a mere 4 minutes on Endor because that's when we're begged to think of Vader as a human with good intentions buried under a wrapping of darkness. It's the first time we see Vader pause and consider his course, and it's largely those few seconds that the entire concept of a tragic and fallen figure hinges on. It's that pause after Luke speaks that allows us to think, "Oh snap! He actually is good inside. He actually just can't find a way back." *sad face*

    Now, this works fine enough as it is, and in all honesty, it's a miracle that it does work because by all merits of writing classes taken everywhere, it really, really, really shouldn't work at all. We never did anything to merit this level of sympathy, and we hardly have any context for it. Vader has been a very wooden and evil character the entire time.
    So, while it does work, it also does kind of inherently beg the question.
    Vader definitely comes across as someone with a pile of baggage that we don't know anything about, and it's a pile of baggage that we only learn about in the last film and within just two scenes, and we only really learn of this baggage in about a minute of film as he's dying. Before that, we just knew that he did actually have humanity left in his personality, and we knew from the throne room that he did actually still have love left as an emotion to some extent, but it was pretty much his death scene which tells us that this guy has a huge pile of pain and baggage that made him this way and he's not really happy with the outcome of it - that he's a suffering character.
    So, yes, this is a character who seems to beg for a backstory that we don't yet know (at the time of the original trilogy).

    Han, on the other hand, doesn't have anything like this. Han has basically one relationship that's from his past that we don't know anything that much about - Lando.
    Hutt's not all that much of a relationship, so there's no problems there, he's just a monetary thug and Han's in bad with him; cool. We're good there.

    Lando is the only character, then, who really represents anything about Han's past, and there doesn't appear to be anything more than "good ol' day" vague references between the two so there's nothing in Han's story that seems like it really needs a backstory to explain anything that we saw in the Original Trilogy about Han.


    Or, is there?

    See, I disagree here.
    I have a LONG running bone to pick with Return of the Jedi in regards to Lando and Han.
    It NEVER made any sense at all, and I basically just ignored it and moved on because...well...Star Wars; lasers *pew* *pew*, cool.
    Meaning; I never really expect flawless plots and writing from Star Wars - I expect remarkably complicated narrative relationships and structures, but not the plots and dialogue ; those things I accept as thin because this is a pulp fiction soap opera.
    So, I did just tend to ignore, it...

    However, it did always bother me as just the largest and most glaring bit of nonsense in the entire original trilogy. More confusing than Luke being more torn up over losing an old man that he's known for a day or two than seeing his Aunt and Uncle, who raised him, dead and burnt crisp down to the bone.

    Here's the problem that I had, and yes we can make up reasons and fill it in ourselves, but it bothered me because it wasn't in the film at all; not even marginally addressed...not even one line of dialogue.


    In Empire Strikes Back, we meet Lando and Han says he's a conman, someone he's known for a long time, and that you can't trust the guy.
    HAN
    Lando's not a system, he's a man.
    Lando Calrissian. He's a card
    player, gambler, scoundrel. You'd
    like him.

    LEIA
    Thanks.

    HAN
    Bespin. It's pretty far, but I
    think we can make it.

    LEIA
    (reading from the
    computer)
    A mining colony?

    HAN
    Yeah, a Tibanna gas mine. Lando
    conned somebody out of it. We
    go back a long way, Lando and me.

    LEIA
    Can you trust him?

    HAN
    No. But he has no love for the
    Empire, I can tell you that.
    Cool.
    And true to that form, Lando is a conman who betrays them.

    Now, they are chummy with each other, they mention vague references to the past; Han chuckles at seeing Lando all grown up and being responsible and we get the whole thing with the winning of the ship, and Lando talking about it being the fastest in the galaxy.
    And Leia walks around the entire time wary and distrustful - probably because Han said that you can't trust this guy; regardless what Han is trying to convince himself of (a pretty regular pattern of behavior with him; thinking something's terrible, and then trying to convince himself that it'll work out), but it does eventually all fall apart and this is one of the last interactions Han has with Lando before Return of the Jedi.

    HAN
    Perfect. You fixed us all pretty
    good, didn't you?
    (spits it out)
    My friend!

    So then Han's tossed in carbonite, and Lando flips around again and helps save everyone.
    Cool.

    But they're too late to save Han; he's gone in carbonite.

    Now in ROTJ, Han is unfrozen and the first time he meets Lando is on the barge when Lando's tossed overboard.

    Another blast from the Barge's deck gun hits near Boba and he is
    knocked unconscious to the deck, next to where Lando is hanging.

    LANDO
    Han! Chewie?

    HAN
    Lando!​

    ---

    Han extends his spear downward to Lando, who is still dangling precariously
    from a rope on the prisoner's skiff.

    HAN
    Lando, grab it!

    LANDO
    Lower it!

    HAN
    I'm trying!​

    ---

    HAN
    Guess I owe you some thanks, too, Lando.

    LANDO
    Figured if I left you frozen like that you'd just give me bad luck the
    rest of my life, so I might as well get you unfrozen sooner or later.

    LEIA
    He means "You're welcome."

    LANDO
    Come on, let's get off this miserable dust ball.​

    ---

    HAN
    Look. I want you to take her. I mean it. Take her. You need all the
    help you can get. She's
    the fastest ship in the fleet.

    LANDO
    All right, old buddy. You know, I know what she means to you. I'll take
    good care of her.
    She-she won't get a scratch. All right?​

    OK, now with what we have on screen, this doesn't make a lot of sense.
    Han is betrayed, not in a sense of con artists and swindlers betraying each other out of money or property; not even in terms of leaving someone stranded and laughing as you leave them to make their way on foot alone.
    No, he betrays Han with what could very easily have been his death. Lando expected that the carbon freezing could very easily kill Han.
    That's what Han last remembers.

    He remembers that Lando all but killed him with his betrayal.

    Now, it makes total sense why Lando needs to save Han, because he feels guilty and needs to make things right, but Han just leaps over the side and helps save Lando without even once saying anything like:

    (after he shoots the tentacle off)
    HAN
    Why should I save you? You almost got me killed!

    LANDO
    I know! I'm sorry! I - I didn't want to! I tried to stop it!

    HAN
    Oh yeah! I can see how hard you tried!

    LANDO
    I did! I lost my mining facility because of it!

    Han pauses for a moment, a bit stunned by this news.

    LANDO
    (slipping a little and barely hanging on)
    Han! Please!

    Han snaps out of thought, looks at Lando, his face shifting from stunned anger to concern, and pulls Lando up onto the barge.

    LANDO
    (panting and slapping Han on the shoulder)
    Thanks Han, old budy!

    HAN
    Oh, you're not out of the woods yet - pal.​

    etc....move on with the show, and rework the giving of the Falcon a bit to fit

    We didn't get anything even close to this.
    They never actually really reconciled the betrayal.
    Lando makes a half-arse joke about bad luck, but hardly anything is done to show some sort of reason why Han wouldn't even care about being betrayed THIS badly by Lando.

    Not only does he seem to care very little about this pretty sizable betrayal, he almost immediately tosses Lando the keys to his prize ship!

    I know this was once Lando's ship, sure, but think about that for a moment.

    Say that you're a smuggler.
    You have a boat that is geared to that, and is one of the fastest and best boats around. You've owned it for decades.
    You bump into a guy you used to run cons and smuggling jobs with (or something like that) and the guy betrays you; turns you over the police and you get knocked into a coma.
    Months later (or something ... ) your friends break you out of jail and you happen to wake up from the coma along the way. During the rescue, while you're still all fog-headed, you hear your old con "friend" who got you turned into the police, and he needs your help.

    So naturally, you save him real quick and toss him the keys to your smuggling boat and jaunt off to another adventure on your fake police boat...

    Wait...what?

    That never made any sense.
    I had to just take it on faith that there was something in Han's background with Lando that made this behavior make sense, because just knowing someone from back when and being in a smuggling and conning circle together definitely wouldn't suffice this level of loyalty; especially a level that doesn't even require acknowledging the problem beyond a half-hearted joke.


    This, for me, was a pretty big whole in the story.
    It wasn't an impossible problem; I could fill in the gaps with my imagination, but it wasn't actually filled in by the story itself. We were never actually given the context of their relationship; it wasn't well defined to support their behavior.
    If anything, you had to discern that they had a pretty deep relationship because of this behavior, because only two people with a close relationship, or a relationship where this is normal in some way, in their past would be this quick to forgive and subsequently trust.

    Trust. The guy who you can't trust, who betrays you, and you wake up, save him, and toss him the keys to your most prized possession, and trust him with it.

    It was just a mess.


    HOWEVER, now that SOLO exists, this is no longer a problem for me.
    It was finally addressed and it now does make perfect sense.

    They had a pretty close relationship, sure, but more importantly, in one scene we learn that betraying Han and leaving him for dead has been a behavior in their relationship since the very beginning.
    Again, this entire problem is solved in one scene:


    And just like that, Lando betraying Han becomes normal for their relationship because in this film Lando does this, and Han patches up with Lando by beating him and taking his ship.

    Touche.

    So, I can't agree that we didn't need this movie.
    Maybe others didn't, but I sure as hell did because ROTJ has always been pretty broken to me before, and now ROTJ's little script wound is perfectly stitched up and good to go because now I know the relationship between Lando and Han, and the relationship they have does indeed provide supporting context to Han's behavior in ROTJ toward Lando.


    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
    #1 Jayson, Jun 2, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2018
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  2. Lock_S_Foils

    Lock_S_Foils Jedi General

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    Well done and well argued. SOLO ties it all together nicely, not only the Lando-Han relationship, but the Han-Chewie and Han-Millenium Falcon dynamics.

    I am falling in love with this movie the more I think about it, and listen to the score!
     
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  3. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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    And the Lando-Falcon.
    Now Lando's googly eyes at the Falcon make more sense. ;)

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
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  4. Sargon

    Sargon Clone Commander

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    For me, I always got the impression from ESB/ROTJ that screwing each other over and then bailing each other out was sort of the basis for their "friendship"; I mean, the word "frenemies" could have been invented just to describe these two. And true, in ESB as far as Han is concerned Lando is leading him to his death, which is a far bigger line cross that just screwing you, it's the ultimate screw, but the thing is Lando didn't lead Han to his death, as soon as Han wakes up he must have realized that Lando's con had a twist to it of some kind. I imagine Chewie filled him on what happened with Lando, since in the scene where Han meets Chewie in the dungeon Chewie starts explaining what Luke has been doing and what's happening. So by the time it comes to saving Lando, he's already had some time to process everything. That, and he needed Lando to get out of there--it's literally Han, Luke, Leia, Chewie and Lando versus the entire barge, so losing one team member would be like losing 20% of your fighting force.

    So, I never had a problem with that part. What I did have a problem with was their reconciliation being cut out of the film when they scrapped the sandstorm scene. Even there it was pretty weak, but it was at least something. I always imagined the non-existent reconcilliation scene must have happened off-camera between them leaving the barge wreckage and getting to their ships (which it does in the deleted scene), but it would have been nicer to have it in the film, for the characters to sort of "close the door" on that whole sub-plot. For me, that's the real problem, and Solo can't change that. But it's more of a satisfaction thing; I did already have the understanding that screwing each other was just how they operated. On the other hand, Han giving up the Falcon to anyone is a bit weird in ROTJ, I always chaulked it up to character growth, as by that point Han was committed to the Rebellion as a General (!), so he knows they "need all the help they can get" and puts the Falcon into service of the Alliance. The film doesn't really dwell on the gravitas of the situation but I think the understanding is that the DSII mission is a literal "do or die" moment for everyone involved.
     
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  5. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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    So I'm not going to argue about whether their relationship did or didn't support what happened on the screen, because that's your interpretation and no one should argue with it, or tell you that it's wrong. That's the point of movies - to personally take from it what is for us.

    What I will point out instead, is that you gained your interpretation by imagining and assuming things to have happened.
    We weren't shown Han having a moment of deduction about Lando's plan, and we weren't shown Chewie filling Han in on Lando.

    Now we don't need to imagine much of anything about Han thinking anything when he wakes up, or Chewie filling him in.

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
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  6. DarthTaris

    DarthTaris Rebel Trooper

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    Great write up with some well thought out comments, though a few things that spring to my mind in response. The tone of Star Wars has always been throwback style to the old Hollywood serials that inspired it like Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon and the 30s movie acting where it was slightly over the top and surface. A perfect eg is the films approach to death as cited; no time for real life dramatic grieving on screen as the plot needs to move forward and the movie is supposed to be a fun adventure. This old skool approach as also always been relevant with Han and Lando the lovable scoundrels as there is a movie shorthand language that establishes them as rogues who happen to be friends which is an old trope that is lost in the more realistic approach to movie characters in this modern age. These characters are larger than life and as Lucas often said they are archetypes with some personality; Lando and Han can't help each other but be opportunists and boys rather than men with regards to maturity and their irresponsibility. I do object to the idea that Lando set Han up for his death as this isn't true - the 'deal' as referred to Darth Vader boldly by Lando was a honeytrap for Skywalker, a guy he never knew therefore had no attachment to and for Han and co to stay on Bespin after it was done. The carbonite test was a witheld reveal from Vader late in the day which Lando was unaware of till it was too late and he finally put his life (and the city) at risk to free Leia and Chewie and try to save Han before Boba Fett took off. Deep down Han knew Lando was in a tricky situation and was upset wit himself probably for taking a chance with his old friend but Lando also really had littlechoice as he states himself - what would we do if Vader arrived just before they did?
     
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  7. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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    I agree about the serial pulp fiction form, which I did note.
    This form is one of my two favorite forms of story telling in cinema (the other being philosophical sci-fi pre-Bladerunner, which I could write at length about as well, but that's for another time), so I'm well aware of the shorthand method employed by it.

    That said, it doesn't remove the problem from existing, and it does stand out more than the usual standard for the style as a bit clunky and forced more than usual.
    It could have been solved by not having Han say thanks to Lando, and instead have it the other way around with an apology (well...their way of apology, which is to jab at each other in a way), especially since Han ended up saving Lando on top of Lando betraying Han.
    It's a bit odd to have Han say thanks to Lando considering these things.

    Again, it's not a big problem that makes the film broken. It's simply that if our position is that Solo wasn't needed, I would beg to differ there because it does clean up that bit of a mess that exists in ROTJ and it does so very well.

    Part of the reason that Solo feels more "Star Warsy" to many is probably that out of the new films, it's the more pulp fiction.
    The rest run more on the newer model of writing which is character driven, in that we dive deep into what they're thinking and feeling; we effectively psychoanalyze them, and the story unfolds to explore that character analysis.

    Solo doesn't really do this. We explore Solo in the way that we explored Indian Jones in the first two films; through watching them externally - jumping through event after event, without really diving into their mind in an intimate way (by contrast to TFA's deep dive into Rey and Kylo's minds, which then went even further in TLJ).

    So Solo did develop this clunky relationship moment in ROTJ, and it did it in a similar style; hats off! Well done!

    As to the death caliber; true. Lando knew that wasn't the agreement, and he was able to tell Leia and Chewie that, but he never told Han that.

    And that's the point here; we don't get an on-screen moment that cleans up anything between them. It was left hanging (cut from the film, partially), and so a bit awkward and ungainly. Even for pulp fiction.

    Again, this doesn't mean that ROTJ is bad.
    It's just that if the position is that Solo was entirely superfluous in terms of story line support, I wouldn't agree, as it enhances, and resolves very cleanly, ESB's and ROTJ's Han and Lando tangent.

    And I do love pulp fiction. I still lament the death of it in cinema. Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade was the death nail, as Indiana Jones was the last champion of the format remaining, and Crusade tossed the format out and went with a character driven narrative (that isn't saying Crusade is a bad movie; far from it. It's just not pulp fiction).
    Star Wars and the first two Indiana Jones films were effectively the last major hurrah of the form in cinema up until Solo (and Solo isn't performing well, so I don't expect the form to catch on like wildfire all of a sudden - especially with the zeitgeist in writing currently to be basically that stories must arise out of internal strife of the character, and resolve that struggle internally through the external plot).

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
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  8. BobaFettNY21

    BobaFettNY21 Force Sensitive

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    What would you say the Brendan Fraser 'Mummy' films are? Wouldn't they be pulp fiction? (I'm not going to ask about League of Extraordinary Gentleman....eek, poor Sean Connery).
     
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  9. Stormagadon

    Stormagadon Cantina Court Jester
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    @Jayson, given your analysis of Han and Lando's friendship, do you think there is room to explore it further if there were to be a sequel to Solo?

    I know I'm speaking partly out of the desire to have a sequel so there's certainly some bias there, but I think we still need to see more of there relationship played out for the greater context.

    They seem a little too chummy in ESB based off the events of Solo alone to me. It's simple enough to brush off and just go along for the adventure, but the danger to explore a relationship by means of prequels always opens a can of worms.

    It would seem reasonable that they would cross paths once or twice, perhaps even team up for some adventure between the events of Solo and ESB. Thoughts?
     
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  10. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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    I would actually say that the first Mummy actually does mostly fit into being pulp fiction-ish. The sequels drifted off and got more into exploring the psyche of the characters, which, to me, is why they started to drop in quality - it's incredibly difficult to successfully take a cardboard character and spin on your heels in short order and compel people to accept them as more than that.

    Many action films seem like pulp fiction candidates as well, but there's a subtle difference between lacking a fleshed out character because you're an action film (everything Seagal has made) and pulp fiction; principally the difference is that action heroes do focus on the character as a motivation point for the plot, but the character is just simple and their issues are superficially addressed and forced (mostly, sometimes it's dug into a bit more, but still, by comparison to a drama, it's pretty superficial), meanwhile, a pulp fiction just accepts the character and all of their flaws as what makes them who they are as a character and doesn't try to offer them therapy to become better by "vomiting" their personal issues onto the screen, but instead has them change (if they even do) through actions which imply that there has been an evolution of their character.

    So yes, I had forgotten about The Mummy, and that was a good re-attempt, but sadly, the follow up didn't do it any favors in preserving the form.

    Oh there's plenty of room remaining for further sequels that explore Lando and Han's relationship, definitely.

    Just because Solo cinched up the loose threads more on Lando's betrayal, I wouldn't say removes any possibility at all that we can easily see more between the two.
    Han says in ESB that they go way back, and true, Solo does go way back, but the way that's explained in ESB, you get the pretty clear sense that they had more than one adventure together.

    Whether the studios will do that or not, I have no idea, but it's definitely available in my opinion.

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
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  11. cawatrooper

    cawatrooper Jedi Commander

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    Interesting thoughts!

    I think you're totally right that this film helps flesh out Lando's relationship with Han, and helps make sense of their rather strange reactions to each other.

    To be honest, I feel like Han and Chewie's relationship improved with this film too, though I hope if we get a sequel the life debt is more thoroughly explained.

    But yeah, I think character development like this is immensely important. To be honest, we don't need any movie... but that doesn't mean this one doesn't benefit the whole, still!
     
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  12. metadude

    metadude Clone Trooper

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    I never understood the "not needed" "didn't ask for it" line of comment. Most people tend to like The Empire Strikes Back but that wasn't needed. The vast majority of movies were neither needed nor asked for, yet myriad people are glad they were made as most of their favorite movies fall into the category. It seems to me a comment that is not well thought through.

    The real problem in "not needed" is that the comment only applies to a continued shallowness of, well, just about anything. What I mean is, take music for example; I can write a very simple piece of music consisting of a melody. Nothing more is really needed. It's a simple work, and simplicity is able to exist in simplicity. But does anyone listen to a complex piece of music and comment "That harmony is not needed" "That modulation is not needed" - it may not be needed if your goal is simplicity, but if your goal is to add depth then it is needed.

    A movie like Solo is adding a layer of depth to the proverbial music. More connections are being made, more interrelations are being established. Is it absolutely necessary? Of course not, very few things are absolutely necessary or needed. Film began as silent movies and people argued that adding sound was not needed. And of course it wasn't absolutely necessary.

    In the story The Hobbit, Bilbo found a ring. There was nothing particularly special about it. But Tolkien took the ring, and added a layer of depth to it and thus the Lord of the Rings was written. A completely unneeded and unnecessary series, one might say. I suppose my point is, when I hear the comment "not needed" or "unnecessary" my first reaction is wanting to ask, "Why don't you level that critique at everything under the sun, including the movies/stories/music/etc. you love?"
     
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  13. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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    I just realized that I left out what I was thinking of adding as the preface to the original post, which was basically this as the first part of the discussion.

    Then it was basically going to segue from the preface to what the OP has with:

    That said, let's redefine what we mean by "needed" to be, "That which resolves issues, quandaries, or oddities within existing parts of the story", as typically, this is what most are likely to be thinking when they claim that an additional anthology is not "needed".
    Basically, I agree with you, but for the sake of addressing the meaning of the argument, I was throwing out my first position with a qualifier, because even if we do so, there's still a problem with that claim.

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
  14. Dawn

    Dawn Rebel General

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    I'll never understand the "it wasn't needed" argument. No movie is ever needed, movies are entertainment, not penicillin.
     
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  15. Jayson

    Jayson Rebel Official

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  16. Dawn

    Dawn Rebel General

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    haha...Someone said the exact same thing I did, I didn't notice that. And I do know what "needed" means in this context, but it still irks me somehow each time I see it. But you agree to my point, so you know exactly what I mean.
     
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  17. Too Gon Onbourbon

    Too Gon Onbourbon Rebelscum

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    Well...I don't agree that Solo fixes the problem, granted it was never more than a hiccup for me.
    My thought was that just by being there Lando was redeemed and I think it was clear even if Han was sore Lando really had little choice and if he could be trusted by Chewie, Leia, and Luke to be there that the water goes under the bridge.

    However, for me Solo doesn't help this dynamic but instead makes it more shaky because now they just don't seem to be tight enough for any betrayal to be a factor.

    As is they played a card game that Lando cheated in, they pulled quick heist, Lando abandons them, Han wins the Falcon, and far as we know that's it. Friends sounds like a big stretch without some other meetings and adventures so for me it slightly screws up the dynamic.

    Where it helps me is that I never really bought Han going all in on the Rebellion as a General. I just felt it was a bridge too far for someone so independent, rogueish, and prone to making things up as he goes along.
    A Davey Crockett like irregular officer I could totally see but all in is not the stuff of a scoundrel even if he has a heart of gold.

    Solo helped provide a little underlying structure in his personality to allow the move to make more sense in combination with him going through the freezing and being rescued.

    I'm still not buying 100% but I'm closer than I was before 5/25 which is why Han backsliding into smuggling and getting into racing and such in TFA not only didn't bother me but made more sense to me than ROTJ for the character.
    I still feel that way but Solo makes me less adamant about it.

    What may long term bug me and force Solo into an ancillary materials area is it compresses all the back story for Han into a week and sort of makes him somewhat of an Al Bundy talking about his four touchdown game in high school.
     
  18. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Rebel General

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    Good movies are always needed and Solo certainly fits the bill (and then some).
     
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  19. SegNerd

    SegNerd Rebel Commander

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    It's needed so we can say, "See, it wasn't a mistake that Han used a unit of distance in ANH!" :)
     
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  20. NunbNuts

    NunbNuts Rebel Commander

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    Do we really "need" any of the new Star Wars films? No, but it's nice they're still making them. And if they're still making them why NOT have one about one of the best characters in the franchise? He was apparently important enough to merit two trilogies of pre-ANH material in the old EU and regardless of the problems Solo had I thought it was better than both of those put together. I didn't think we needed to turn 2 sentences from ANH's opening crawl into a 2 hour movie called Rogue One but it wasn't any skin off my butt that they did. I can't imagine why it was "needed" but it also didn't do any harm.
     
    #20 NunbNuts, Jun 18, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2018 at 12:12 AM
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