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What makes Star Wars unique isn't that it's a Sci-Fi Fantasy

Discussion in 'General Movie Discussion' started by Jayson, Dec 30, 2020.

  1. Jayson

    Jayson Resident Lucasian

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    I have gone on about this several times before.
    Such as here, here, or here for example.

    Star Wars isn't made unique and isn't made to feel like Star Wars because it is a science fantasy film, or because it has light sabers, or rebels, or imperial bad guys, or any of that stuff really.

    Those all matter, don't get me wrong, because of how they're used metaphorically to build imagery that communicates with little needing to be said, but what makes Star Wars truly feel "Star Warsy" is the way that Lucas moves through a story.

    It's a way that's really just not done a lot.
    It's the baton passing narrative.

    In summary, every moment connects to the next almost exactly by context. Show me, tell me, show me.
    Show me what's happening, tell me why, show me what's happening, tell me who, show me what's happening...

    And each is an arm linked to the next. If you want to jump scenes, it's only possible to jump to contexts that we already know. You almost never jump scenes to whole new set ups we know nothing about - we've either seen that context before, or it's been mentioned.

    Today I discovered a fellow on Youtube took the time to cover it with a video exposition that makes understanding those differences rather clear.



    I love the ST, but I love the ST for entirely different reasons than I love the original Star Wars.
    I love it because it's absolutely fascinating to watch new creators struggle and try to hang on to the reigns of what Lucas did.

    How they differ shows so much about Lucas's craft because they are attempting to do their version of following Lucas' vision.

    I've also said this before: Solo is the closest of any of the new films to feel like Star Wars.

    And it's in part because of this. It adheres to the employment of cliche' archetypes to communicate quickly and clearly, it uses all of its designs to render metaphors to communicate with little needing to be said, and it adheres to the baton storytelling method,

    There is a more recent film that did it as well.
    And here's a REALLY great way to understand what is so amazingly effective about the baton method of story telling...how well you can STILL understand the film when it's running impossibly fast.



    Viva le Baton!

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
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  2. Ghost of Obi Wan Kenobi

    Ghost of Obi Wan Kenobi Rebel Official

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    One indicator I listen for to decipher whether a person/persons truly know what Star Wars is, is whether they refer to it as a sc-fi.
    “But.. but.. it takes place in outer space!” These people say. “How can it NOT be a science fiction without spaceships?”
    I then reply: “Nope. Star Wars is actually a space opera.”
    “What’s that? I’ve never heard of that.”
    And that’s when I realize this person/persons do not really understand what George Lucas has created.

    In all honesty, George Lucas’ Star Wars shares more in common with Shakespeare (family ties and struggles) or Arthurian legends (the hero’s quest) than sci-fi like Star Trek.

    I might add that visually, Star Wars did borrow from the sci-fi of the 20s-50s.
     
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  3. Jayson

    Jayson Resident Lucasian

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    I go a step further.

    I listen for whether they speak of the film or the characters.
    If they speak of the latter, we can talk.

    But if they speak of the film, then we can really talk.

    And funnily enough, I was just talking with @Angelman about the relationship between Metropolis and Star Wars - it's far more than simply 3PO. It was about how Star Wars was the first film to really take on the incredible cinematic ideas that Metropolis ambitioned.

    You look around at the time of Metropolis, like Star Wars, there was just simply nothing else like it.
    And it too also moves in the baton passing narrative way, and uses the distanced "objective" camera of a more documentarian style (another unique attribute to Lucas' Star Wars) where the actors act to each other far more than the camera.
    Quite a lot of this was by convention of the time, but the shear scale and wonder of Metropolis was not conventional. Nor were its optical effects. Nor its deeply metaphorical German expressionism.

    That's where Star Wars gets truly interesting. This marriage of all of these disparate traditions into one giant massive opus of cinema itself.

    Cheers,
    Jayson
     
    #3 Jayson, Dec 30, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2020
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