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OFFICIAL NEWS Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker General Movie Discussion

Discussion in 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' started by Trevor, May 31, 2019.

  1. Everton8898

    Everton8898 Rebelscum

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    Less than 2 hours to go till the midnight showings over in the uk

    Just rewatched the force awakens and the the ginger step child of Star Wars TLJ

    Love to say I’m excited but given the train wreck that was the last Jedi it’s kinda dampened the evening

    hope it can save the saga and has at least something everyone will enjoy in it

    happy viewing guys
     
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  2. Maul99

    Maul99 Rebel Trooper

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    Rey being a Palpatine, actually works. Here's why:

    I believe, Emperor Palpatine wanted her trained and was going to clone her. Remember TLJ, I believed it was foreshadowed when Rey stood in front of a bunch of mirror's? She snapped her fingers, but the reflections did not snap at the same time.

    I believe, Snoke was the test for Palpatine.

    Mod edit: Remember, do not post spoilers here, people!
     
    #802 Maul99, Dec 20, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2019
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  3. MacKoi

    MacKoi Clone

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    Honestly..what just happened with the final trilogy?...i mean cmon...why ruin a legacy..
     
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  4. Supreme Leader Snoke

    Supreme Leader Snoke Rebel Trooper

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    Introduction the idea that Leia is at least as strong as Luke if not stronger makes no sense! Why didn't she remove the rocks at the end of Last Jedi then instead of Rey!? Why was finding Like SUCH a big deal if she was basically his equal.
     
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  5. Lord Phanatic

    Lord Phanatic Moff Gideon Wannabe

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    Yea I've seen so many people go different ways in their opinion. Lucas had an overall plan that was tweaked here and there. If disney did have a plan, it didn't seem very lucid IMO. I did however enjoy the movie. Resorting back to Jacen and Jaina helps me a lot with the dynamics of this trilogy. Also, unfortunately, this trilogy has forced me NOT to take star wars as serious as I did. It's just not going to go back to what it once was. We (OT old school heads) probably experienced a once in a lifetime magic and I'm totally fine with that. I still have a lot of fun with the new movies and I'm grateful for even having the opportunity to experience new films.
     
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  6. AdeRenlim

    AdeRenlim Clone

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    Totally happy with Ep9. Satisfying end to the saga for me!
     
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  7. Lord Phanatic

    Lord Phanatic Moff Gideon Wannabe

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    Hmmm. I'm going to have to walk back on my post above. I'm in love with this movie. I saw it again last night for a third time and it really hit me. I really love this movie even more than empire. That statement coming from a huge TESB child such as myself is hhhhhuge. This movie just really did it for me. It was awesome to see Kylo throw his saber into the turbulent waves. That was very metephorical. His weapon was symbolic of his violent past of unrest and he threw it, facing forward, not tossing it nonchalantly over his back but with aggresive purpose into the turbulent waves symbolizing his turbulent past ( let the past die. Kill it if you have to). That was for me was one of the most powerful scenes ever in star wars.
    Then. OMG then. Luke lifts his x wing out of the ocean of his past where he tried to bury what he once was. That in and of itself can also be interpreted as a type of rise of Skywalker. That along with the same John Williams score when Yoda lifted Luke's x wing from the swamp. These two scenes for starters. This movie really hit home for me in so many ways.
     
    #807 Lord Phanatic, Dec 25, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2019
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  8. Darth Qaidous

    Darth Qaidous Rebel Official

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    Just saw this today, flawed like every other Star Wars film, and awesome like every other Star Wars film, too.

    So much going on within TRoS that it could have stood to be stretched out for a few more minutes, but good as it was.

    I will always wonder what George Lucas' version of the ST was, but this is the ST we have and I liked it as it was warts and all.

    The story (film to film to film) is more cohesive than it's detractors make it out to be.
     
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  9. NunbNuts

    NunbNuts Rebel General

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    I thought it was pretty lame and really poorly made. Writing disagreements aside that was the poorest editing/directing I've seen in a Star Wars movie. It felt so amateur. It was the least fun I've ever had in the theater watching a Star Wars movie. I didn't think the prequels were great but at least back then getting to see a new Star Wars movie was a novel experience.
     
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  10. jefferywinkler

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    I wrote the following article before I watched the last Star Wars movie.

    When George Lucas was writing the first Star Wars movie, in the earliest drafts, it was called "The Star Wars", the hero was named "Starkiller", and it was set on 23rd Century Earth. It was more similar to Flash Gordon or Buck Rogers. Then George Lucas read "Hero with a Thousand Faces" by Joseph Campbell, and was profoundly influenced by it. He penned the famous "fourth draft", which was steeped with mythos, with elements like "the kybur crystal" and the "princess of ondos". He continued to rewrite the script, and it went through numerous iterations. Even after it was filmed, he continued to edit it very heavily, cutting out whole scenes, and then it was finally released on May 25, 1977. The only reason 20th Century Fox took a chance on his odd movie was because of his previous success with "American Graffitti".

    Before it was released, neither George Lucas or anyone else could have possibly imagined how popular it would be. Therefore, George Lucas wrote the script on the assumption that the first movie would be the ONLY Star Wars movie EVER MADE!!!! Let that fact penetrate your skull. Try to remember that before the first movie was released, it would have been ludicrous for him to assume anything else. Therefore, the first Star Wars movie was intended as a stand alone film. Now try to imagine an alternate version of history in which the first movie was the only one ever made. Anyone watching the movie would have no doubt in their mind about the fact that Darth Vadar was killed when the Death Star exploded, the Empire ceased to exist with the death of their leader, Han Solo received redemption by showing up at the end of the battle, proving that, aww shucks, he does care about other people, and then Luke and Leia get married, and live happily ever after. We see Vadar's ship spinning out of the control, and then he is caught in the explosion, so he presumably was killed in the explosion. Therefore, Luke Skywalker killed his father's murderer, successfully avenging his father's death. There is no mention of anyone more powerful than Vadar. It would be no more possible for a farmboy to be related to a princess than for a jawa to be related to a bantha. Han Solo even got the reward money from helping to rescue the princess so he could pay off his debts so even that loose end was tied up.

    This original intent by George Lucas also had a striking resemblance to "Lord of the Rings". In both cases, a small rag tag group of rebels fight a losing war against a vast evil empire led by a dehumanized faceless omnipotent force of evil, whose power is derived from a specific physical object. An unlikely hero from a small rural community on the edge of the known world destroys the evil object, which destroys the evil villian, which destroys the evil empire.

    Then, to George Lucas' flabbergasted shock, Star Wars was single the most popular movie to ever exist since Eadweard Muybridge invented the motion picture in 1878. Also, in incredible good fortune, there was a very unusual clause in George Lucas' contract that gave him rights to money from merchandise. George Lucas did not need to beg 20th Century Fox to let him make a sequel. He could just found his own company of Lucasfilm, and do it himself. Then he would allow 20th Century Fox to distribute it.

    Then, he did face a slight problem of how do you write a sequel when he tied up all the loose ends. His solution was to change his mind about all of those things. Fortunately, he had previously cut out a scene where Luke and Biggs were discussing Vadar killing Luke's father in great detail. If he had left that in, there would be no back peddling out of it. He invented Palpatine. He invented Yoda. He invented the idea that Darth Vadar was Luke's father, and Luke and Leia were brother sister, as far fetched as that sounds. None of these things crossed his mind in 1977. However, he was able to get it to work, and "Empire Strikes Back" was one of the best Star Wars movies. All three movies in the first trilogy are motivated primarily by the themes George Lucas drew from ancient mythology and Joseph Campbell. It has overarching themes of the hero's journey, and the triumph of good over evil. The hero has to reject evil, which is what Luke does on Bespin when Vadar reaches his hand down to Luke hanging over the precipice, and Luke chooses to jump off rather than take Vadar's hand.

    When "Return of the Jedi" was released in 1983, George Lucas and everyone else assumed that would be the last Star Wars movie made. He was previously made off hand remarks about making prequels but he did not actually seriously think that would ever happen. The first trilogy stands on it's own, and if that had been the end, no one would have been surprised or disappointed. What changed, is that in the 1990s, computer animation improved to the point where George Lucas thought he could do things in new movies which he could not have done before, and he embarked on a second trilogy of prequels. "Phantom Menace" was released in 1999. The much maligned prequels actually deal with thought provoking subtle issues, such as what causes a good person to become evil. Anakin's personal transition from good to evil is mirrored by the entire country transitioning from good to evil, from Republic to Empire. The Republic under Palpatine was modeled directly on the administration of George W. Bush. In the months and years immediately following 9/11, the United States government committed unspeakable atrocities all over the world, as well documented by books such as "The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned Into a War on American Ideals" by Jane Mayer, and "Hubris The Inside Story of Spin, Scandal, and the Selling of the Iraq War" by Michael Isikoff and David Corn. What enables a small number of bad people to do evil things is a large number of good people willing to look the other way. In real life, people went along with the U.S. sliding into brutal tyranny and war crimes because they were terrified of Muslim terrorists. In the prequels, the good people of the Republic went along with their country transitioning into the Empire because they were afraid of the separatists. This macrocosm of suffering on a galactic scale is mirrored by the microcosm of Anakin's tormented mind, as he spirals out of control. Of course this subtle psychological study and political commentary is lost on the Star Wars fans who never tire of their favorite past time which is trashing the prequels.

    At one time, in the early 1980s, they were planning to make a Star Trek TV series using the same actors as the original series, except Leonard Nimoy was not available, so they were planning to replace Spock with a different Vulcan named Xon, played by a different actor, who literally received several death threats in the mail from several different people. Why did all of these different people send death threats to this innocent actor? They never made that TV series, but later, they made a different TV series using different actors called "Star Trek: Next Generation". Today, it is a consensus among Star Trek fans that TNG is the best Trek series, but this is ironic because when it first aired, it was the target of irrational hysterical vitriol from Star Trek fans. The more devoted a Star Trek fan you were, the more vicious your attack on the very idea of "Next Generation" without having ever watched it. Why? Because it did not have their favorite characters in it! The very idea of Star Trek without Kirk was regarded as some sort of blasphemy.

    You had a similar problem with the prequels. Even the characters that were supposed to be the same, such as Obi-Wan, C3P0, and Yoda, were different than what they remember. Their favorite characters, Luke, Leia, Han, Lando, were not in it at all. The fans of the Star Wars movies were fans of absent characters, and they were never going to warm up to the prequels. Also, by that time, they had been waiting almost 20 years for a sequel, and no movie was going to live up to that level of expectation.

    In the early 1970s, George Lucas was a member of an informal group of writers and film makers who were against the cooperate world of studios and networks, and who were desperate to be free of it. Other members included George Lucas' friends Francis Ford Coppola and Steven Spielberg. All three agreed that the studio system was stifling, and that film makers should be free to pursue their vision. They believed that it was wrong to be motivated by profit, and this was partly influenced by the hippie philosophy against capitalism. Other people who were part of this movement were Jim Henson and Ken Burns, both of whom made shows for PBS which has no profit motive. Jim Henson made the Muppet Show in Britain since at that time British television was owned by the government. Ironically, this is all perfectly consistent with George Lucas making a fortune off Star Wars since that gave him the independence from the studio system they all craved. Basically, he made so much money, he did not have to care about money. Jim Henson created many of the characters in Star Wars. It is therefore puzzling that decades later, both Jim Henson and George Lucas sold out to the ultimate epitome of the corporations they were fighting against, which is Disney. Their motivation may have been so their beloved creations could outlive them, which happened tragically all to soon, in the case of Jim Henson. George Lucas, in his twilight years, may have been considering his legacy. However, the quality of both the Muppets and Star Wars, has diminished since Disney took charge.

    Disney, the archetypal giant cooperation, is obsessed with profit, to the exclusion of all else. George Lucas gave up creative control of his own characters. When George Lucas was in charge, they would release Star Wars movies in May, so kids could easily see it when they are not in school. When Disney was in charge, they would release Star Wars movies in December, so people would buy more Star Wars merchandise as Christmas gifts. Disney made a calculation that they could make more money giving the fans what they want which was a sequel to Star Wars that was identical to the first Star Wars movie, which was what "Force Awakens" was, to appeal to the nostalgia of old men who want to relive their childhood, and recapture the feeling they had as a little boy sitting in the movie theater in 1977. In order to make it the same, you have to go back to it being a small rag tag group of good guys fighting against an all powerful evil empire. Basically, you have to pretend that "Return of the Jedi" never happened. It does not matter if that does not make any sense. The audience in the theater roared with applause when they first saw Harrison Ford on the screen. The grand finale at the end of the movie, the moment you have all been waiting for, was catching a glimpse of Mark Hamill for a few seconds.

    Star Wars, a New Hope, and the Force Awakens have the following identical plot.

    A teenager living on a remote desert planet stumbles upon a comical small droid that contains a secret message which must be brought to the leaders of a group of good guys fighting much more powerful bad guys. The unlikely hero gets swept into a galactic civil war. They have to rescue a love interest that has been captured. They run into Han Solo on the Millennium Falcon. At the end, they destroy the Death Star after it destroyed a planet. The good guys pull it out despite long odds.

    You might say a major difference is that in the first movie, the teenager is a boy, but in "A Force Awakens", it is a girl. However, even that is less of a difference when you consider that, in an early draft, George Lucas considered making Luke a girl, and then changed his mind.

    However, it is worse than that because the politics of the galaxy in "A Force Awakens" is the same as it was in the first Star Wars movie. In the first Star Wars movie, you have a small rag tag group of rebels fighting a quixotic battle against a much more powerful evil empire. The bad guys are the government, and their military looks like the military of a country. They have a large number of well trained organized soldiers in identical uniforms. They have a large number of large ships. Meanwhile, the good guys are just a small band of rag tag rebels, without formal training, without uniforms, with a small number of small ships.

    The theme of a small number of good guys defeating far more powerful bad guys is a reoccurring theme in fantasy. In "Lord of the Rings", the small group of good guys are able to defeat the far more powerful forces of Sauron. This is also a reoccuring them in George Lucas' career, underlying films as diverse as "THX-1138", "Tucker", and "Willow".

    Then at the end of "Return of the Jedi", the good guys won. After that, the good guys took over the government. Then the good guys were the government. Their military would look like the military of a country. They have a large number of well trained organized soldiers in identical uniforms. They have a large number of large ships. If the bad guys reconstituted, they would now be the small group of rebels, without formal training, without uniforms, with a small number of small ships.

    Or so you would think. Instead, in "The Force Awakens", the bad guys are the government, and their military looks like the military of a country. They have a large number of well trained organized soldiers in identical uniforms. They have a large number of large ships. Meanwhile, the good guys are just a small band of rag tag rebels, without formal training, without uniforms, with a small number of small ships. Not only that, but everyone looks identical to what they looked like in the first Star Wars movie. Their uniforms look identical. Their ships look identical. In "The Force Awakens", the Empire has stormtroopers, TIE fighters, and star destroyers that look identical to the first movie. How could they afford all of that, without a country? Where were those ships built? Meanwhile, the good guys still look like a ragtag group of rebels. Why don't they have uniforms? Why are they still flying small X-wing fighters identical to what they had in the first movie? Everything looks the same as the first movie.

    Basically, they said, "Oh, let's just pretend Return of the Jedi never happened!"

    In fact, we know the reason for this. They were trying to appeal to the nostalgia of men in their 40s and 50s trying to recapture how they felt when they were a little boy sitting in the movie theater in 1977. In order to do that, they intentionally made "The Force Awakens" as similar to the first movie as possible. J. J. Abrams publicly said that was his goal. They went so far as to include the superfluous Death Star at end of the movie, which was totally unnecessary and irrelevant to the supposed goal of getting the data in BB-8 to the good guys so they could locate Luke Skywalker. Their target audience would not feel the same as they did when they were a little boy unless you blow up a Death Star at the end.


    I wrote the following article after I watched the last Star Wars movie.

    I strongly disagree with the decision to bring Palpatine back. It negates Vadar's sacrifice where he sacrificed his own life to kill Palpatine to save his son's life. It makes the victory at the end of Return of Jedi completely meaningless because it turns out that they did not defeat Palpatine after all. It makes all the good guys look stupid for being duped. It begs the question of how he could have survived, much less continued the pull the strings behind the scenes without anyone knowing, much less amassed a staggering military, much larger than what the Empire had, much larger ships, much more ships, more powerful weapons, all in secret without anyone knowing. How was all of that paid for? If he could do all of that without being the leader of a country, then why did he bother becoming the political leader of the galaxy in the first place? Before it was assumed that he became the leader of the galaxy so he could turn it into a totalitarian regime, and then divert the national resources to the war machine to fuel conquest, so he could rule the world, as many men have done in real life. Here, somehow without a country, without resources, without a source of revenue, he inexplicably created a military a thousand times large as what the empire had, not so he could rule the world, but so he could kill everyone for no reason, and rule no one. In the first movie, Darth Vadar required all the money and resources of the Empire to create the first Death Star so he could use it to threaten planetary leaders so he could rule the galaxy. Here, Palpatine, without a country, without any resources, without money, without anyone knowing, created literally thousands of death stars, because each ship is a death star that can destroy a planet, and not to threaten people so he can rule them, no, but instead so he can just send out the ships to blow up all the planets with people on them so there will be no people left in the galaxy, for no reason whatsoever, so he would then be left ruling nobody at all.

    At the end of "Return of the Jedi, Special Edition", we see scenes of celebrating crowds on different planets all over the galaxy, celebrating the death of Palpatine. It makes all those people seem extra stupid.

    However, the most stupid part is none of that. The most stupid part is lowering and reducing Star Wars to the level of low quality mediocre children's TV shows were the bad guys are never killed because they always come back. It is like a comic book or Saturday morning cartoon. On Superman, they are not going to kill Lex Luther. On Batman, if the Joker is killed, you know he's going to come back. On G.I. Joe, they are not going to get rid of Cobra. On Transformers, you know the Decepticons will always come back. They are literally reducing Star Wars to the level of a low quality children's Saturday morning cartoon where the villain is never killed, or even if they are killed, they always magically come back. Not only that, but he's more powerful, and each dasterdly plan is more grandoise and far fetched than the last. In the first Batman movie, the Joker falls off the top of a skycraper and is killed, but of course that's not the end of the Joker, since of course, he comes back and nobody cares. They have reduced Star Wars to a really bad Saturday morning cartoon. It's like an episode of Voltron. They went from small death star to big death star to thousands of death stars. Otherwise, the good guys are not topping themselves each time they defeat him.

    And how on Earth was he able to come back? At the end of Return of the Jedi, Darth Vadar picks up Palpatine and directs the lightening from Palpatine's fingers onto his own face, and then throws him into a bottomless pit. You imagine that maybe he grabbed ahold of a ledge, and later climbed out. He could have used his powers to heal himself. That would be consistent with Palpatine's appearance in the last movie where he is haggard, and hooked up to machines that keep himself alive. Since he's hanging by a thread, it makes it harder to believe that he was able to achieve everything he achieved, and control everything behind the scenes, but at least, it would make it more consistent with him surviving and climbing out of the pit he was thrown into. HOWEVER, this somewhat plausible explanation is then contradicted, in the same movie, with the good guys talking about "cloning", and then in Palpatine's secret lair, with what look like vats of liquid containing bodies, presumably clones of Palpatine. Ok, so are they then claiming that this Palpatine is a clone of the one that was killed? If that's the case, then why is he old and haggard, barely alive, being kept alive by machines? If he was a clone, then wouldn't he be young, and fit as a fiddle? If he was old and in bad shape because he was thrown in the pit, then why mention clones? Which is it? I mean the writers are stupid, and never made up their own mind about how Palpatine came back to life. I guess they did not think that was important.

    At in the opening crawl, it says that Palpatine broadcast a message but then it was never mentioned again. What was the message? Why would he send a message to the good guys unless this is another example of Star Wars being reduced to the level of a bad comic book when the villain inexplicably warns the good guys for no reason?

    Another thing I strongly disagree with was the decision to make Rey the granddaughter of Palpatine. When George Lucas wrote Star Wars, he never imagined that Darth Vadar, Luke, or Leia were related. When he wrote "Empire Strikes Back", he thought up the idea that Darth Vadar was Luke's father, and that Luke and Leia were brother sister. After that, the Star Wars fans just expected that all the characters had to be related. When they first released "The Force Awakens", all the fans speculated what Rey's family relationship was. Was she Luke's daughter? Rian Johnson was the writer and director of the next movie "The Last Jedi", and he said that he wanted to put an end to that, and decided that Rey was not related to anyone famous. I agree with that decision. How many people live in the Star Wars galaxy? What percentage are related to the main characters? What is the statistical likelihood that someone chosen at random will happen to be related to one of the main characters? Why does the main character have to be biologically related to other characters? Are we saying you can't be important unless you are biologically related to someone important? Are we saying that someone from a humble background without famous parents can't become a hero? Rian Johnson was making a fair point, but in the last movie they had to fall back into form and suddenly declare that Rey was the granddaughter of Palpatine. It just came out of the blue. It implies that she would not be important otherwise.

    Even more stupid than that, they then declare that Luke and Leia "always knew". What? How would they know? Even Kylo Ren had no idea despite his immense power with the Force. Why would they not tell her? She lived with Luke, and he never thought to bring it up? When Rey meets Leia for the first time, Leia doesn't even acknowledge her at all. She just dismisses her as some waif that her ex-husband picked up. Now we are supposed to believe they "knew all along"?

    "Star Wars, a New Hope", and "The Force Awakens" have the following identical plot.

    A teenager living on a remote desert planet stumbles upon a comical small droid that contains a secret message which must be brought to the leaders of a group of good guys fighting much more powerful bad guys. The unlikely hero gets swept into a galactic civil war. They have to rescue a love interest that has been captured. They run into Han Solo on the Millennium Falcon. At the end, they destroy the Death Star after it destroyed a planet. The good guys pull it out despite long odds.

    However, it is worse than that because the politics of the galaxy in "A Force Awakens" is the same as it was in the first Star Wars movie. In the first Star Wars movie, you have a small rag tag group of rebels fighting a quixotic battle against a much more powerful evil empire. The bad guys are the government, and their military looks like the military of a country. They have a large number of well trained organized soldiers in identical uniforms. They have a large number of large ships. Meanwhile, the good guys are just a small band of rag tag rebels, without formal training, without uniforms, with a small number of small ships.

    Then at the end of "Return of the Jedi", the good guys won. After that, the good guys took over the government. Then the good guys were the government. Their military would look like the military of a country. They have a large number of well trained organized soldiers in identical uniforms. They have a large number of large ships. If the bad guys reconstituted, they would now be the small group of rebels, without formal training, without uniforms, with a small number of small ships.

    Or so you would think. Instead, in "The Force Awakens", the bad guys are the government, and their military looks like the military of a country. They have a large number of well trained organized soldiers in identical uniforms. They have a large number of large ships. Meanwhile, the good guys are just a small band of rag tag rebels, without formal training, without uniforms, with a small number of small ships. Not only that, but everyone looks identical to what they looked like in the first Star Wars movie. Their uniforms look identical. Their ships look identical. In "The Force Awakens", the Empire has stormtroopers, TIE fighters, and star destroyers that look identical to the first movie. How could they afford all of that, without a country? Where were those ships built? Meanwhile, the good guys still look like a ragtag group of rebels. Why don't they have uniforms? Why are they still flying small X-wing fighters identical to what they had in the first movie? Everything looks the same as the first movie.

    Basically, they said, "Oh, let's just pretend Return of the Jedi never happened!"

    However, in the last movie, "Rise of Skywalker", they made it a thousand times worse. One of the leaders of the "First Order" said, "They will increase our ships a thousand fold". So he is saying that, despite the staggering number of ships that the First Order had, Palpatine had one thousand times as many as that. They are also saying they have thousands of death stars because each ship is a death star because each ship can destroy a planet. In the first Star Wars movie there was a Death Star. In "The Force Awakens", there was a giant Death Star. Now, in "Rise of Skywalker", they are claiming that every single one of the bad guy's ships is a death star, since every ship can destroy a planet. Think how difficult it was for the Empire to make the first Death Star. Think of how much of the national economy had to be diverted into that single huge project. Think how many years it took to build it. Think how many people it took to build it. It was a strain for a huge powerful rich country with unlimited resources. Now imagine the farcical world of "Rise of Skywalker" where Palpatine, who magically came back to life, barely hanging on by a thread, kept alive by machines, without a country, without money, without resources, has been secretly running everything without anyone knowing, just casually built thousands and thousands of death stars, each with the capabilities of the original, as if it was no big deal at all. How on Earth could he do this? If it was that easy, why was it so difficult to build the first one? If he could do it without a country, then why he bother becoming the leader of a country? The good guy's victory at the end of "Return of the Jedi" was all for nothing because he was more powerful afterwards than he was before. Furthermore, why is he doing this? Before, it was assumed that he was like many brutal tyrants in the real world who use tyrannical regimes and military conquest to "rule the world". However, in the last movie, he says he is going to use the ships to blow up all the planets and kill all the people in the galaxy so he would end up ruling nothing at all. Why would he want to do that?

    He says he wants Rey to kill him, and then he says he doesn't want Rey to kill him? He says he wants Rey to kill him so his soul can go into her? Has his soul been previously going into clones, and if so, why not continue doing that? Earlier the writers were claiming that if Rey kills Palpatine, that will blacken her soul, and she would become a Sith, but then she does kill him, and that does not happen, so the writers can't make up their mind about that. If this dagger is a thousand years old, how can it contain the location of the small pyramid among the wreckage of the Battle of Endor? Whoever made it had detailed knowledge of what the wreckage would look like a thousand years later? Why was that small pyramid on the wreckage anyway? Why on the second death star would there be a small pyramid containing the location of where this fleet of a thousand death stars would be hiding 35 years in the future? What was Finn's secret? When they are sinking into the quicksand, Finn is presumably about the tell Rey he loves her but this is never brought up again so that entire story line, which existed throughout the last three movies, is left entirely unresolved. They could have easily included a short scene where Rey says "What were you going to say?", Finn says "I love you", and Rey says "I know". I think it is obvious the writers originally intended the romantic interest to be between Finn and Rey but then changed their mind. Why couldn't Rey sense that Chewbacca was not on the transport that was destroyed, since later, she can sense him when he is far away? Later on, she senses he was on a ship. Why couldn't she do that earlier? How did Lando so easily and quickly assemble this entire giant fleet, apparently the largest the galaxy had ever seen? Is a copy of C3PO's entire brain always stored inside R2D2, and if so, why was anyone sad when they rebooted C3PO? Normally you might think that claiming R2D2 contains a copy of C3PO's entire brain inside him would be the most ludicrous thing in Star Wars if it wasn't for the fact they now had thousands of death stars. Why did they include that scene where Po's ex-girlfriend hands him this small circular fake ID if he was not going to use it, and it was never mentioned again? I expected him to use the fake ID to gain entry to the enemy ship, but instead, they just land, kill two guards, and casually waltz around the ship. What would happen if a small plane landed on a U.S. aircraft carrier without permission, and when two U.S. Navy officers approached the plane, people on the plane shot and killed the two U.S. Navy officers? How and why were those horses running around on top of a spaceship, and what happened to them, because they are never seen again? They greatly rewrote the script after Carrie Fisher died. They had to write the script around the unused footage they had of Carrie Fisher. They should release the original script they wrote before Carrie Fisher died so we could at least know what they were planning to do. Perhaps part of the reason why this monstrosity was so badly cobbled together is because they cut out scenes with Carrie Fisher. The crawl mentions a message from Palpatine which was never mentioned again. Maybe originally, there was supposed to be a scene with Carrie Fisher where she talked about it.
     
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  11. Solo

    Solo Rebel Official

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    Unfortunately, I agree. :(
     
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  12. JacobTheJedi

    JacobTheJedi Clone Commander

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    I was really dissapointed in this movie. During my first viewings of TFA and TLJ, everybody in the theater was cheering at major moments. To this day I've never seen a more bored crowd.
     
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  13. Pizza Time

    Pizza Time Rebel General

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    What about the scene where Luke lifted his X-Wing, mirroring ESB? My crowd was really excited watching that, and I got the feels. Such a beautiful call back.
     
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  14. JacobTheJedi

    JacobTheJedi Clone Commander

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    There were a few looks, but it had been so quiet for the entire movie that I don't think they had it in em to cheer.
     
  15. Darth Basin The Greatest

    Darth Basin The Greatest Rebel Official

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    The only big cheers I heard was when Lando showed up, Luke caught the saber, lifted the X‐wing & the 29 seconds of Reylo.

    Nobody knew who wedge was in my theater.
     
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  16. Andrew Waples

    Andrew Waples Jedi General

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    Well he seems willing to do more Ben Solo.
     
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  17. Angelman

    Angelman Servant to the Whills & Slave to the Muses
    1030th Junior * (Mod)

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    You gotta love Adam Driver; he's so warm and sincere, and a great presence.

    As for "doing another one", that would be cool, of course, but it's hard to see where to go with his character for a whole story. Perhaps the best LFL could do with these ST characters now is to have a TV show set in the pre-ST years (or possibly touching on the TLJ to TRoS time jump) and have Kylo & Hux and whatever come in every now and again as cameos in other characters' story. Or they could do some serious de-aging stuff and make a film about Ben's training and schism from Luke's school, but that sounds a bit too costy and complicated for quite a small premise. (I would MUCH rather see a de-aged effort with Mark Hamill about Luke's adventures between RotJ and setting up his school). Of course, you could easily do another set of stories with (some of) the surviving heroes, but characters such as Kylo -- whose stories are really tied & focused to the ST arc -- would be more problematic. That said, if LFL can find something interesting to do with the character, then I'm all for a return of Adam Driver/Ben/Kylo to Star Wars! :D
     
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  18. Bobsmith12345678

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  19. Jedi MD

    Jedi MD Jedi Commander

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    First off, welcome to the Cantina. However, I hope you did not become a member today just to post this article. This is the second thread with the exact same post and you only have three posts so far.
     
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  20. Use the Falchion

    Use the Falchion Rebel Official

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    Yeah, pretty much the same on both of my viewings. A few chuckles, a few claps, but nothing like when I saw TFA or Endgame.*

    *I mention those two in particular because those were the only two I was able to see in America. The other movies I saw while living overseas, and the culture of movie watching where I was is very, VERY different. Complete silence. It was weird. I did happen to see Infinity War in Australia though. Packed theater and a rowdy crowd. That was fun!

    More or less the same in mine, and even then the cheers weren't that loud.

    All of that said, while I'm not the largest fan of the movie (it does more wrong than right IMO, and most of the right it does do doesn't feel earned, authentic, or enjoyable for the most part), I love the fact that other people love the movie. So as much as I'm a downer on this, I like cheering those who love it on.

    Edit: @Bobsmith12345678 Welcome to the Cantina!
     
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