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Vader's plan in TESB...

Discussion in 'Original Trilogy' started by Get In Gear, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. Get In Gear

    Get In Gear Force Sensitive

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    I was kind of thinking about this the other day, and it occured to me that it seems people often look really deeply into the actions and motivations of the heroes in the saga, and a lot of time is spent discussing the pros and cons of what they did and why they did it.
    Then it struck me, people don't ever seem to give to much thought to what was going on at the end of TESB - I mean, I've never really seen a lot of consideration being given to what Vader was actually trying to achieve there...


    Okay - here are a few non-submersible points we can discern by the time of TESB, intentionally ignoring anything which may have been established by the EU...

    • Vader senses that the Force is strong with the Rebel pilot who eventually destroys the Death Star.
    • Even if he is not aware of the name of the vessel at the time (he appears to be later) Vader knows that the Millennium Falcon is being used by the people who busted Leia out of the Death Star, and that they have some connection with Obi-Wan, because they brought him with them.
    • Vader is obsessed with finding Luke Skywalker following the destruction of the Death Star, so says the opening crawl to TESB. He clearly knows the Rebel he is after is called 'Skywalker': "That is the system. And I'm sure Skywalker is with them."

    Now, the scene where Vader communicates with Palpatine, as we all know, was changed in 2004. Prior to this change, the dynamic of this scene always seemed pretty clear cut to me: Vader had latched on to the idea that Luke may be his son, and was - to an extent - using the pursuit of the Rebels as a cover to tracking down Luke specifically. Palpatine basically catches Vader with his trousers down - he is saying "look, Vader, I know what you know, and I know what you are up to here..." Vader knows that with Luke by his side, he may be able to overthrow the Emperor. Palpatine knows Luke is a threat, but the idea of a new, improved apprentice is too irresistable an opportunity to pass up. Because that is how Palpatine rolls. They are both playing each other, although that is not obvious until you see what happens as the saga progresses.
    The revised scene implies Vader was obsessed with finding this boy called Skywalker, but needed Palpatine to point out to him the possibility that it was his own son.
    Either way, I suppose it's irrelevant to the point I'm making - by this point in the saga, tracking down Luke and luring him to the Dark Side, or destroying him, is Vader's goal, is Palpatine's goal, and is, by proxy, the goal of the Empire in general.

    • Vader and Palpatine do not seem to know Yoda is still alive. "He's just a boy, Obi-Wan can no longer help him". Vader knows this, because he killed Obi-Wan. Later: "Obi-Wan has taught you well." And even in ROTJ, it is all about Obi-Wan, in fact he repeats that exact same line during their duel.

    But I'm getting ahead of myself a bit there, the point I am getting to relates to the time before Luke is ever face to face with Vader. I'm just kind of setting the scene, considering everything we know up to this point...

    • After the battle of Hoth, Vader immediately turns his attentions to hunting down the Millennium Falcon. I suppose this is the basis for the first part of my question. Well, it's not so much a question, just some random thoughts on things I kind of always took for granted:
    The Rebels were being evacuated under cover of the Ion Cannon. I'm not sure how or why the Empire fell for that same trick every time a wave of vessels were evacuated, but let's just presume they did, and the Rebels all whizzed past the Imperial craft and jumped straight to hyperspace without pursuit. Vader is on the surface of Hoth when Leia, Han, Chewie and 3PO blast of in the Falcon. Luke is also still preparing to leave, because we see him watch the Falcon get safely away.
    So, did the Empire turn its attentions to the Falcon simply because it was the only craft that didn't blast straight off into hyperspace, as it was unable to do so? At what point did Vader actually come up with his plan of using Leia and Han as bait? Did Vader simply presume Luke was onboard the Falcon initially - it's the craft he was on when he rescued the princess? And if he did, at what point did he decide Luke was not? What Lando says suggests that the Falcon being on Cloud City was always intended as a trap for Luke, but I suppose that could also have only become the case once the ship had landed and it became clear Luke wasn't onboard...

    So that's basically it - what was Vader's plan in TESB, and how did he come up with it?

    It seems simple on the surface, but it's not something I've ever thought about in much detail before. I'm not saying there is a flaw in the plan, just that it's interesting to break it down from Vader's point of view.

    • Vader knows - or presumes - Obi had been training Luke at some point before he died. And to be fair, he did sense the Force was with Luke and see that he was able to bullseye the Death Star's one weak spot, against the odds.
    But, by the same token, he didn't have much else to go on. It's not like he had ever seen Luke in action, or even knew that he owned a lightsaber. That said, we can also say that Luke was creating a disturbance in the Force sensed by both Vader and his Emperor.
    • Vader knows that Leia would "never consciously betray the Rebellion". She would even watch her home planet be destroyed before selling out the Rebels. It is worth noting to that at this point, Vader and Tarkin seem quite happy to assassinate a member of the Imperial Senate, once she has outlived her usefulness. These are the kind of people Vader was dealing with, and this is how little value they were to him.
    • So, by the end of TESB, Leia and Han are kept alive - just as bait to draw Luke to Bespin. Firstly, how could Vader have possibly known Luke was powerful enough to sense their pain and take the bait. If he was powerful enough to sense the trap, then surely he may also have been powerful, and schooled enough, to resist the bait?
    And, secondly, how did he know these people mattered to Luke? Like I said, Leia's family and friends back on Alderaan probably mattered to her, but she still didn't betray the cause of the Rebellion to protect them. Vader has no evidence Luke would even care. Yes, he was the one who helped rescue the princess first time around, but from Vader's point of view, Luke may simply be totally committed to the Rebel cause - what went down on the first Death Star could purely have been about Luke getting the plans delivered to the Rebellion so that they could destroy the station. He has no reason to presume Luke actually cares about these people, or that - if he did - he would risk the greater cause for their sake.

    Because the thing is, we know that Luke is still undergoing training with Yoda on Dagobah, Vader does not. We know that Luke struggling with these visions of his friends being made to suffer, but Vader could not have known. For all he knew, Luke was on the other side of the galaxy with the rest of his Rebel chums after the evacuation of Hoth, and Leia and Han were just presumed dead, martyrs for the Rebel plight. For all he knew, Luke just might not be that well-trained enough to have even sensed Leia and Han's situation.
    Because when Luke eventually does turn up, Vader is impressed by the extent of his abilities. Even though he was kind of relying upon them for his plan to work.

    It's interesting, because it seems pretty clear Vader was expecting the whole thing to end right there in the carbon freezing chamber. Bang, force him into the pit, flip the switch, one frozen Skywalker. All too easy...
    It's also interesting to imagine how things might have played out next were that the case. Did Vader then just deliver Luke to the Emperor - was that ever his plan? Or did he intend to double-cross Palpatine and make the same offer to Luke he eventually did - to team up with him and overthrow the Emperor?
    People often speculate as to when, if ever, Yoda and Obi-Wan intended to tell Luke the truth about his father... but I've not really seen much discussion about the timing of Vader making that revelation. Was it only once he had seen how powerful Luke really was that this became Vader's plan, when he was convinced Luke may be powerful enough to overthrow the Emperor if he could somehow appeal to him? I'd say it is more likely this must have been his plan all along, given the conversation with Palpatine earlier in the movie. Or was he just waiting until Luke was beaten, until Luke was backed into a corner to drop the revelation, so that Luke would see it as his only option? Because then, that doesn't fit in with Vader's clear intention for the encounter to be over the moment Luke had dropped into the carbon freezing chamber.

    So many possibilities as to what might have actually happened next had Luke been frozen...
    Do we go from here straight to the confrontation we eventually get to see in Jedi, but with an "unprepared" Luke? Imagine the revelation about Luke's father only coming out then, in front of the Emperor?
    Or do we encounter a Luke being held by Vader, after being freed from the carbonite, and Vader revealing the truth and making Luke an offer he is not in a position to refuse...?

    What do people think Vader was trying to do, or do you think he was kind of winging it...?
    Do you think Vader's plan changed as he fought with Luke - when he went from being "just a boy" to someone who could actually hold his own?
    And do think Vader was ever puzzled about how Obi was able to train him so well?
     
    #1 Get In Gear, Jun 19, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2015
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  2. Grand Master Galen Marek

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    Vader had a plan before meeting his son on Cloud City, capture him then use him to kill the emperor.
     
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  3. DEKKA129

    DEKKA129 Professional Slinger of Balderdash
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    First of all, I always assumed that there had been additional Rebel actions against the Empire between ANH and ESB, and that Imperial intelligence had connected Skywalker, Solo, Leia Organa and the Millennium Falcon through that. Wanted posters and all that schtuff.


    I can't flippin' stand the revised scene. The original said everything that needed to be said, and in the way that it needed to be said. And you're right... all the revised version really does is to make Vader look like a feeb who has been chasing Luke across the galaxy but never managed to make the obvious connection that a young man strong in the Force who's named Skywalker just might be his kid. To me, this scene is a perfect example of PT-era Lucas' need to overexplain everything to death onscreen.

    As for Vader's plan, I always felt that while he improvised somewhat as he went along, his plan was to do exactly what he tells Luke on Cloud City - get Luke to join him, train him in the ways of the dark side, and overthrow the Emperor.

    IMHO, the problem isn't in how Vader's intentions were presented in ESB. Most of the problem stems from the fact that Lucas ended up tossing almost all of it out the window in ROTJ. There's not a hint there of Vader's stated desire to overthrow the Emperor, even when he and Luke are alone on the Endor landing platform. Now he's just playing fetch for his master. Not that that's out of character for a Sith, but it completely discounts most of the motivation we saw for Darth Vader in ESB.

    The other part of the problem is the way Lucas kept playing the "It's A Small Galaxy After All" game in the PT. In the OT, Vader assumed that Obi Wan would have been the only one who could possibly have trained Luke, and the Emperor never seemed to bat an eye at that. Yoda wasn't even a consideration, because at that point Yoda was just this wise little Jedi master who lived on a bog planet that was hell and gone from everywhere. Yoda seemed such a part of that swamp (and it of him) that it wasn't even clear that he'd ever lived anywhere else, or that anyone other than Obi Wan and Luke (and Artoo) knew about him.

    Then the PT rolls around and suddenly we've got Yoda, the Emperor, Vader and Obi Wan having all hung out together years before. On top of which, Palpatine knew first-hand that Yoda had survived Order 66. All of which makes it seem that much more odd and awkward later on that neither Vader nor the Emperor ever stopped to consider that Yoda could have trained Luke.
     
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  4. Bosc

    Bosc Force Attuned
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    The way I see it is this:

    The opening crawl states that Vader is "obsessed" with finding Luke. I've always taken that to mean that he knew who Luke was and, if only by virtue of the last name, knew he was his son. Thanks to recent comics, we know this to be true with certainty now. That he acts surprised when the Emperor starts telling him about it is a lie. I think Vader's plan all along was to train Luke as his apprentice and then overthrow Palpatine. He was derailed by Palpatine's request, but then was back on track when he was unable to carbon freeze Luke.
     
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  5. Cole

    Cole Force Sensitive

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    I think Vader had a good idea of how Luke would react to the "bait". He reacted how Anakin would have reacted. That's his son. And then there's "forseeing" which the Emperor seems to be so good at. Anakin, in the prequels, seemed to have some visions of the future. And Luke, of course could see some visions. Visions of loved ones suffering is a big part of what turned Anakin.

    I don't think it all went according to plan, obviously, luke wasn't on the Falcon, he had to change the plan. And of course I doubt he was expecting Luke to let go and fall down the chasm. And I doubt he was expecting the Falcon to get away. (deactivated hyperdrive). So, good plans, good contengencies, but it just didn't work out for him in the end...

    That double-take look on Vader's "face" when the Falcon gets away!(dark) Piet is sure he's about to get choked, haha.
     
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  6. Get In Gear

    Get In Gear Force Sensitive

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    That's funny, because I was reading some great stuff about both of those subjects just last night, that came up in the ROTJ story conference prior to Kasdan's second draft, as reprinted in Rinzler's Making of ROTJ book. Bit long-winded for a message board post, but worth reading just to see what was going through their minds back then:

    It does certainly make me appreciate more why that whole issue of Vader wanting to turn Luke / The Emperor wanting to turn Luke was handled the way it was in ROTJ after reading some of the reasoning behind it...

    I do wish that vision of Yoda was retained.
    The subtle difference between "Yoda, the Jedi Master, who instructed me..." and "Yoda, the Jedi Master who instructed me..."
     
    #6 Get In Gear, Jun 24, 2015
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  7. Cole

    Cole Force Sensitive

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    I wish RotS would have been everything that Lucas said in that last Quote!!! :(
     
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  8. Rebo

    Rebo Nearsighted Whill Guardian
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    I hate being this guy, because I used to hate it when people would pull out the EU on me to derail perfectly great speculation, but since they are canon I think a lot of this has to be colored by the revelations of the Vader comic.

    In spoilers for those who haven't read.
    Vader is trying to play the Emperor. Having witnessed Palpatine's effort to replace him, he is running a secret mission with the aid of Boba Fett to track down the force user who blew up the death Star. Along the way he finds out who Luke is. What happens from there remains to be seen.

    All that being said, there is still a lot of room for interpretation here. I just think that makes the ESB scene with Palpatine more clear cut that it might have been before.

    As for the plan. The way I figure it. The Falcon leaves Hoth but can't jump to light speed. Vader recognizes the ship as one with a direct connection to Luke. (Its role in bringing Obi-Wan to the Death Star and its presence at Yavin). At this point, Vader probably knows that he doesn't sense a force user on that ship but figures he can use it as bait. The torture, although not a definite draw for Luke, can't hurt. And we know Vader doesn't care if he hurts people unnecessarily. He assumes Luke will show eventually. But knowing he is his son, and therefore very powerful with the force, it can't hurt to try in order to speed up the process. And he can get his jollies torturing the guy who shot him out of the air at the battle of Yavin in the process.
     
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  9. DEKKA129

    DEKKA129 Professional Slinger of Balderdash
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    Funny... right here in all of this we see laid out in so many words some key elements of the subtext and backstory that I always saw in the OT, and that Lucas ended up throwing out when he finally made the PT. You know, the kind of stuff that we were assured that we'd just made up in our heads and turned into impossible standards for the PT to live up to?

    Yoda - not a Jedi warrior. Not a hyperactive saber-wielding pinball bouncing around the room taking on Sith lords. A teacher, a mentor, a priest/monk type whose power with the Force goes far beyond that of a mere warrior. The same, in a reversed/negative image, with the Emperor. No lightsaber up the sleeve, because he doesn't need anything as petty as a weapon.

    And Anakin going off on missions and murdering his fellow Jedi based on whatever line the Emperor was feeding him, with his wife and Obi Wan eventually finding out and having to deal with not only Anakin but also what to do about the twins... this sounds far more like the genesis of Darth Vader than Anakin turning to the dark side because he loved his wife too damned much. Plus, having Leia's mother die when Leia was a couple years old dovetails FAR more closely with what Leia told Luke in ROTJ than what we ended up seeing in the PT.

    I don't mean to get us too far off onto this track, but these ROTJ story conferences really do shine a lot of light on what Lucas' backstory was at the time he completed the OT, versus what he changed it to when he made the PT.

    Now, about Vader's plan for turning Luke... ;)
     
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  10. Rebo

    Rebo Nearsighted Whill Guardian
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    I wonder how much of a plan there really was. Vader was turned so easily. Its common for someone with a certain flaw to see that flaw as common in all people. I wonder if Vader thought Luke would fall as easily as he did. That the fear of losing attachment, the fear of death, and the lust for power would be something inherent in any person. Palpatine was an evil genius. Laying out long cons and pulling strings for years to get what he want. What we canonically see of Anakin Skywalker, is a bit of a dumb brute. Someone who jumps in head first without thinking. Would the Anakin of the PT even have a plan for turning Luke. Or would he just go in, egotistically assuming, that Luke would turn just because Anakin did?
     
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  11. DEKKA129

    DEKKA129 Professional Slinger of Balderdash
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    And see, this is where I think that the PT fails the OT.

    The character of Anakin Skywalker and how he turned to the dark side in the PT bears little relation to Anakin as envisioned by George Lucas at the time he was making ESB and ROTJ. The ROTJ story conference transcripts that GiG posted are pretty solid evidence of this. There are also other subtext and backstory elements that Lucas radically changed between the time he made ROTJ and the time he made the PT.

    So we end up with two options, neither of which I particularly like. Either completely ignore the PT whilst watching the OT, or else mentally retcon the OT.
     
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  12. Rebo

    Rebo Nearsighted Whill Guardian
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    I personally like to take a third option. Re-envision the PT with my own context. I like to imagine that off-screen Anakin is more the person we expected from the OT and that we happen to see him at his worst because he's a horny teenager obsessed with a queen. That when the camera stops rolling, he is a intelligent badass who would be fully capable of what he would become as Vader. Its a stretch, but it lets me sleep at night. :)
     
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  13. Get In Gear

    Get In Gear Force Sensitive

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    I must confess, when I initially posted I was thinking more of Vader's short-term plan as opposed to his long-term ambitions.
    It just kind of struck me - as amazing as TESB is - there is an strand to it that I'd never noticed before until recently... that, because we have the privilege of seeing Luke's training and progress play out simultaneously with everything else that's going on, it makes it easy for us to accept what Vader is "wanting to happen" because we see how that dovetails into what Luke is experiencing.
    But when you actually think about it, Vader had no reason to believe his trap on Bespin was actually going to attract Luke, and he also had no reason to presume Obi-Wan had not actually already told Luke Vader was his father. For all Vader knows, Obi-Wan could have been preparing Luke for this from birth...
    --- Double Post Merged, Jun 25, 2015, Original Post Date: Jun 24, 2015 ---
    I guess the way I look at things, the films and the process that went into them are primarily what interests me.
    I'm kind of into the idea that a canon of work - in its strictest sense - is usually something which is discerned by scholars and enthusiasts through study and classification, rather than dictated by the company churning stuff out.
    Don't get me wrong - I accept and appreciate that if something is canon, then it is "canon" in the grand scheme of things - and there are lots of EU nuggets I have enjoyed over the years...

    But, by the same token, I think people just rely on "canon" as a shortcut to finding some kind of "truth".
    Because, the only truth - for me - is the bit that is rooted in the real world: that some talented people spent years making these films way back when. They made decisions. They had intentions. Some we know about, some we don't. Some we possibly never will. That really happened - that is "the truth".
    So, sometimes I look at the movies, and I just want to explore them further, try to delve deeper into them - by understanding more about the process behind their creation and the circumstances under which they were made. And what the story is all about - what these people were trying to get across onscreen.

    I guess there are just different ways of looking at these things.

    So when I consider "what was Vader's plan?" there are different contexts to apply to that question.
    And while I appreciate the answer that some author - 30-odd years detached from the making of the movies and the people who made them - came up with an interesting story involving Vader to fill some chronological gaps in the story, and got the thumbs up from the "story group"... that's usually not the answer I am interested in hearing. I tend to gravitate towards trying to understand what is going on in the movies themselves, within the context of the movies themselves.

    It's great that Marvel are making new SW stories - the Dark Horse stuff had become pretty stagnant, IMHO - but to be honest, these things rarely change my opinions or interpretations of the movies, whether we are told they are canon or not. My reaction tends to be "oh, they are saying is canon now... okay, whatever..."

    But, of course, that's just me... :)
     
    #13 Get In Gear, Jun 25, 2015
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  14. Rebo

    Rebo Nearsighted Whill Guardian
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    And I am with you on that. This is the problem that designating canon causes. Multiple possible truths based on what you consider as fact. It can stifle discussion like this because if you want to explore something ignoring what came later, anyone can come in like I just did and throw a wrench by incorporating additional material.

    And it isn't just comics or video games. As @DEKKA129 illustrated some may not want to consider the PT when examining the OT. To your point, if you really want to get in the heads of the filmmakers to establish original intent, you can't even consider what happened in RotJ as that had not been cemented at the time of production. All of these variables can remove any equal ground for people who want to discuss making it difficult to examine in a forum like this.

    Best as I can see it, for a truly deep examination to take place rules need to be set up front. As the OP, what would you like to consider as basis for the discussion? As it is your thread you get to be god here and decide what exists and what doesn't for the sake of this conversation. :)

    If we are only considering all 3 OT films, then I still stand by my stance that Vader is anticipating Luke arriving based on his past experience with the Falcon. And I would think its a safe bet, albeit one that paid off far faster than it probably should have. But someone who had trained with Kenobi, blown up the death star, and snuck into an enemy stronghold to rescue the princess is likely to attempt a rescue again. It may not be a fool proof plan, but is probably a wiser approach than starting the hunt from scratch having just missed his opportunity to grab Luke at the Hoth base.
     
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  15. Pobody's Nerfect

    Pobody's Nerfect Jedi Commander

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    Vader was a slave to Watto, then a slave to the Jedi Order, then a slave to Emperor Palpatine. The only free breath he ever took was when Luke removed his helmet. But somehow, even though he spent his entire life following orders, he was always his own man.

    As a boy he fooled Watto into thinking the pod racer he built was Qui-Gonn's. Later he got married and kept it a secret from his Jedi masters. His was a passive/aggressive kind of slavery. He did what he was told to do but he also did things in secret that nobody else knew about.

    I have no problem believing Vader continued keeping secrets from his new master, Palatine. And I think the moment the Emperor confided in Vader that Luke Skywalker could overthrow the Emperor, Vader hatched a plan.

    This wasn't the first time Vader planned to overthrow the Emperor. Remember when he told Padme he could overthrow Palpatine and invited her to rule the Galaxy with him? Padme was dead by Empire, of course, but the child she bore Vader was available, and the idea of family certainly appealed to Vader.

    So yes, I think if Luke had been willing to listen, Vader would have offered to combine the Imperial fleet with the Rebel fleet and fly back to Corusant as conquerors.
     
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  16. Cole

    Cole Force Sensitive

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    Somehow Vader did know that Luke was ignorant of his heritage. He say's with confidence, "Obiwan never told you what happened to your father."

    He knows how sneeky Obiwan could be. He new Obiwan wouldn't want to tell Luke, "I chopped your father into pieces and left him burning alive in a pool of lava." I'm sure Obiwan was shamed by what he considers his greatest failure, and didn't really want to bring it up when he decided it was time to try and train another Skywalker. He new Obiwan well (like a father or older brother). Vader knew Luke knew nothing, because he knew Obiwan so well.

    ...Or he could sense with the Force somehow that Luke didn't know.
     
    #16 Cole, Jun 25, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2015
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  17. Grand Master Galen Marek

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    Yep I thought more could have been added.
     
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  18. Get In Gear

    Get In Gear Force Sensitive

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    Nah, there's no right or wrong answer. And it's a fairly trivial thing anyway really. I suppose I'm just curious what different conclusions people come to despite having seen the exact same movie...

    So I guess the other part of my point was - taking all the above as a given - at what point did "capturing the Falcon" become secondary to "using it to lure Luke". What I mean is, did he think Luke was onboard the Falcon initially? Vader had to get to Bespin before the Falcon and describe a plan to Lando which involved setting a trap for "someone called Skywalker"... At what point did he decide he was going to do that?
    I know it's not really important, but it kind of intrigues me...
     
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  19. Rebo

    Rebo Nearsighted Whill Guardian
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    Its all important. Its Star Wars. We over-analyze. That's why we're here. :)

    The way I see it, Vader could probably sense before the asteroid field that Luke wasn't on the Falcon. But he also knew Luke was close with the crew having come with them to save Leia and having The Falcon save his ass at Yavin. So, I'm thinking as soon as Vader saw the Falcon in his grasp he hatched the plan. I would bet that if the torture hadn't drawn him in, he would have left the garrison on Bespin to hold Han and Leia until Luke did show up. There's no downside there. He could leave them there indefinitely while he resumed his search elsewhere. Like leaving a patrol car outside of fugitive's house. Sometimes they're just dumb enough to go home.

    The plan just worked better than he could have hoped because of Luke's weakness and attachment to his friends. Had Luke waited, Vader might have left Cloud City, Luke could have become a fully trained Jedi Knight, and waltzed into save his friends from a few stormtroopers a couple months later without having to confront Vader or lose his hand. But he rushed, so Vader's plan worked, and Luke payed a pretty steep price.
     
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  20. TheFettMan

    TheFettMan Rebel Official

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    Darth Vader, (darth) was conflicted & filled with doubt-mixed emotions in TESB.
    He sought out Luke not only because of the father/son issue but because he felt Skywalker could aid in the final elimination of the Rebel Alliance.
    Echo Base and the Rebels on Hoth were only a small section of the Alliance. The size & activity isn't really explained until ROTJ(1983).
    Some forum members rail on it, but I still think Yoda's TESB remarks or actions may apply to TFA more than Luke or the OT characters.
    The significance of the Magic Tree scenes & the weird way Yoda answers Obi-Wan when Luke leaves; saying NO, ... There is another.
    Could the other be Finn or maybe Rey?
    Master Yoda was in hiding & 976. If he didn't "die" he could have stayed around to train or condition Rey or Finn in the Jedi ways.
    Luke's fears and failures may mean he is NOT the Jedi meant to balance the force. Yoda might have sensed it.
     
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